The Relationships Among Perceived Social Stigma, Depressive Symptoms, Anxiety, and Self-Reported Medication Adherence in Persons with HIV

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147073
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationships Among Perceived Social Stigma, Depressive Symptoms, Anxiety, and Self-Reported Medication Adherence in Persons with HIV
Abstract:
The Relationships Among Perceived Social Stigma, Depressive Symptoms, Anxiety, and Self-Reported Medication Adherence in Persons with HIV
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Cha, EunSeok, PhD, RN, MPH, MSN(c)
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pittsburgh
Title:Master Student
Co-Authors:Judith A. Erlen, PhD, RN, FAAN; Kevin H. Kim, ; Susan Sereika, PhD
[Clinical Session Presentation] This study examined the relationships among perceived social stigma (thinking), depressive symptoms and anxiety (feeling), and self-reported medication adherence (behaving) using the Cognitive Behavior Therapy model. Specifically, we examined 1) the mediation of depressive symptoms and anxiety on the prediction of self-reported medication adherence by perceived social stigma, and 2) the relationship between anxiety and depressive symptoms in persons with HIV. Baseline data from "Improving Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy" (2R01 NR04749) were used. The 346 persons with HIV (male =243, female= 103) ranging in age from 20 to 66 were recruited from multiple sites in western Pennsylvania and Ohio. HIV related social stigma (Social and Emotional Aspects Scale), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory), anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory), and self-reported medication adherence (Morisky Self-report Medication Taking Scale) were measured. Structural equation modeling (EQS version 6.1) was used to estimate both direct (regression coefficients) and indirect effects. Depressive symptoms fully mediated the prediction of self-reported medication adherence by perceived social stigma (Beta = -0.33 --> - 0.07, z = -4.99, p<.001). However, anxiety did not predict self-reported medication adherence: the Wald test suggested deleting the direct path between anxiety and medication adherence ( Chi square (1)=.229, p=. 632). Only a positive correlation between depressive symptoms and anxiety was identified (r =.50, p<.001). Therefore, the final model including a mediator (depressive symptoms) on self-reported medication adherence and a positive correlation between depressive symptoms and anxiety was tested. The final model showed a good fit: S-B Chi square(13)=25.81, p=. 018, CFI=-.98, RMSEA=.053. Understanding the influence of depressive symptoms and anxiety between perceived social stigma and self-reported medication adherence in persons with HIV may be important to develop better medication adherence strategies for this specific population. Future work needs to examine moderation effects (e.g., socio-demograpic and cultural variables) on the same model.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationships Among Perceived Social Stigma, Depressive Symptoms, Anxiety, and Self-Reported Medication Adherence in Persons with HIVen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147073-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationships Among Perceived Social Stigma, Depressive Symptoms, Anxiety, and Self-Reported Medication Adherence in Persons with HIV</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cha, EunSeok, PhD, RN, MPH, MSN(c)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pittsburgh</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Master Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">esc24@pitt.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith A. Erlen, PhD, RN, FAAN; Kevin H. Kim, ; Susan Sereika, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical Session Presentation] This study examined the relationships among perceived social stigma (thinking), depressive symptoms and anxiety (feeling), and self-reported medication adherence (behaving) using the Cognitive Behavior Therapy model. Specifically, we examined 1) the mediation of depressive symptoms and anxiety on the prediction of self-reported medication adherence by perceived social stigma, and 2) the relationship between anxiety and depressive symptoms in persons with HIV. Baseline data from &quot;Improving Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy&quot; (2R01 NR04749) were used. The 346 persons with HIV (male =243, female= 103) ranging in age from 20 to 66 were recruited from multiple sites in western Pennsylvania and Ohio. HIV related social stigma (Social and Emotional Aspects Scale), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory), anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory), and self-reported medication adherence (Morisky Self-report Medication Taking Scale) were measured. Structural equation modeling (EQS version 6.1) was used to estimate both direct (regression coefficients) and indirect effects. Depressive symptoms fully mediated the prediction of self-reported medication adherence by perceived social stigma (Beta = -0.33 --&gt; - 0.07, z = -4.99, p&lt;.001). However, anxiety did not predict self-reported medication adherence: the Wald test suggested deleting the direct path between anxiety and medication adherence ( Chi square (1)=.229, p=. 632). Only a positive correlation between depressive symptoms and anxiety was identified (r =.50, p&lt;.001). Therefore, the final model including a mediator (depressive symptoms) on self-reported medication adherence and a positive correlation between depressive symptoms and anxiety was tested. The final model showed a good fit: S-B Chi square(13)=25.81, p=. 018, CFI=-.98, RMSEA=.053. Understanding the influence of depressive symptoms and anxiety between perceived social stigma and self-reported medication adherence in persons with HIV may be important to develop better medication adherence strategies for this specific population. Future work needs to examine moderation effects (e.g., socio-demograpic and cultural variables) on the same model.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:29:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:29:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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