2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147080
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gastric Tube Placement in Neonates
Abstract:
Gastric Tube Placement in Neonates
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Ellett, Marsha L., DNS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University School of Nursing
Title:Professor
[Scientific Session Presentation]Aim: One of the aims of this study was to test four methods of predicting the distance to insert a nasogastric/orogastric (NG/OG) tube in neonates (term and preterm) to determine which was most accurate in placing the tube in the stomach. Design: Randomized clinical trial Method: The four methods tested were nose-ear-xiphoid (NEX), nose-ear-mid-umbilicus (NEMU), length-based, and weight-based. In neonates whose length was > 47 cm, one of the first three methods was randomly selected to predict the distance to insert the tube. If the neonate was = 47 cm in length, one of the first two methods was used. Weight was obtained so that the fourth method could also be tested in all infants. An abdominal radiograph was obtained immediately following tube insertion to determine the internal location of the tube tip and orifice(s). Results: Based on data from 110 neonates (< 1 month of age), the NEMU and length-based methods were more accurate in the longer (older) infants and NEMU and weight were more accurate in the shorter (younger) infants. NEX was the least accurate method; it was frequently too short leaving the tube tip and/or orifices in the esophagus. A new regression equation using length specific to neonates is proposed. Conclusion: Measuring the NEX distance is the method most commonly used by nurses in practice; therefore, based on the results of this study and studies of other researchers, a practice change may need to be considered to improve the safety of enteral feeding in neonates.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGastric Tube Placement in Neonatesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147080-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gastric Tube Placement in Neonates</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ellett, Marsha L., DNS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mlellett@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation]Aim: One of the aims of this study was to test four methods of predicting the distance to insert a nasogastric/orogastric (NG/OG) tube in neonates (term and preterm) to determine which was most accurate in placing the tube in the stomach. Design: Randomized clinical trial Method: The four methods tested were nose-ear-xiphoid (NEX), nose-ear-mid-umbilicus (NEMU), length-based, and weight-based. In neonates whose length was &gt; 47 cm, one of the first three methods was randomly selected to predict the distance to insert the tube. If the neonate was = 47 cm in length, one of the first two methods was used. Weight was obtained so that the fourth method could also be tested in all infants. An abdominal radiograph was obtained immediately following tube insertion to determine the internal location of the tube tip and orifice(s). Results: Based on data from 110 neonates (&lt; 1 month of age), the NEMU and length-based methods were more accurate in the longer (older) infants and NEMU and weight were more accurate in the shorter (younger) infants. NEX was the least accurate method; it was frequently too short leaving the tube tip and/or orifices in the esophagus. A new regression equation using length specific to neonates is proposed. Conclusion: Measuring the NEX distance is the method most commonly used by nurses in practice; therefore, based on the results of this study and studies of other researchers, a practice change may need to be considered to improve the safety of enteral feeding in neonates.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:29:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:29:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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