Physical Activity, Nutritional Intention, and General Health Risk in Adolescent Girls Enrolled in a HIV Intervention Trial

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147085
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physical Activity, Nutritional Intention, and General Health Risk in Adolescent Girls Enrolled in a HIV Intervention Trial
Abstract:
Physical Activity, Nutritional Intention, and General Health Risk in Adolescent Girls Enrolled in a HIV Intervention Trial
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Groth, Susan W., PhD, RN, WHNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Rochester
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Dianne Morrison-Beedy, PhD, RN, WHNP-BC, FNAP, FAAN
[Scientific Session Presentation] Background: Obesity is an expanding epidemic in adolescents and lack of physical activity (PA) is a major contributor. Physical activity lessens as girls get older. The literature clearly indicates that the intention to engage in a health behavior is highly correlated with actual behavior. It is less clear whether intention to engage in one health behavior, such as healthy eating is reflective of overall engagement in general health practices.Purpose: To describe the health behaviors of impoverished adolescent girls and identify whether intention to engage in healthy nutritional patterns is related to engagement in PA and other health behaviors. Methods: Data were collected as part of a randomized controlled HIV prevention trial. The sample consisted of 742 urban, predominantly minority adolescent girls. At baseline, general health behaviors of regular PA, nutritional intentions, seatbelt use, and sleep were assessed using audio computer assisted self interviews. .Results:  Only 15% of the girls met PA recommendations; less than 30% averaged 2-3 days of PA/week and 23% reported no PA. Although 89% indicated they would not avoid unhealthy foods, 80% indicated they would not definitely include recommended amounts of fruits/vegetables in their diets. Over 75% did not meet sleep recommendations. Regression analyses indicated that those meeting PA recommendations had significantly higher scores on positive health behaviors (p< .001). They reported more sleep (p < .001) and regular seatbelt use (p = .003) than those less active. Nutritional intentions predicted regular PA (p < .001), sleep (p < .001), and seatbelt use (p < .001). Conclusions: These adolescent girls were at risk for obesity due to minimal PA and poor nutritional intentions. Intention to engage in healthy eating was reflective of engagement in a constellation of healthy behaviors. These findings are useful for tailoring interventions to prevent obesity in at-risk adolescent girls.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysical Activity, Nutritional Intention, and General Health Risk in Adolescent Girls Enrolled in a HIV Intervention Trialen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147085-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Physical Activity, Nutritional Intention, and General Health Risk in Adolescent Girls Enrolled in a HIV Intervention Trial</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Groth, Susan W., PhD, RN, WHNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Rochester</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">susan_groth@urmc.rochester.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Dianne Morrison-Beedy, PhD, RN, WHNP-BC, FNAP, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] Background: Obesity is an expanding epidemic in adolescents and lack of physical activity (PA) is a major contributor. Physical activity lessens as girls get older. The literature clearly indicates that the intention to engage in a health behavior is highly correlated with actual behavior. It is less clear whether intention to engage in one health behavior, such as healthy eating is reflective of overall engagement in general health practices.Purpose: To describe the health behaviors of impoverished adolescent girls and identify whether intention to engage in healthy nutritional patterns is related to engagement in PA and other health behaviors. Methods: Data were collected as part of a randomized controlled HIV prevention trial. The sample consisted of 742 urban, predominantly minority adolescent girls. At baseline, general health behaviors of regular PA, nutritional intentions, seatbelt use, and sleep were assessed using audio computer assisted self interviews. .Results:&nbsp; Only 15% of the girls met PA recommendations; less than 30% averaged 2-3 days of PA/week and 23% reported no PA. Although 89% indicated they would not avoid unhealthy foods, 80% indicated they would not definitely include recommended amounts of fruits/vegetables in their diets. Over 75% did not meet sleep recommendations. Regression analyses indicated that those meeting PA recommendations had significantly higher scores on positive health behaviors (p&lt; .001). They reported more sleep (p &lt; .001) and regular seatbelt use (p = .003) than those less active. Nutritional intentions predicted regular PA (p &lt; .001), sleep (p &lt; .001), and seatbelt use (p &lt; .001). Conclusions: These adolescent girls were at risk for obesity due to minimal PA and poor nutritional intentions. Intention to engage in healthy eating was reflective of engagement in a constellation of healthy behaviors. These findings are useful for tailoring interventions to prevent obesity in at-risk adolescent girls.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:29:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:29:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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