2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147088
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community-Based Discharge Planning: Consumer Perspectives
Abstract:
Community-Based Discharge Planning: Consumer Perspectives
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Jensen, Elsabeth, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:York University/Lawson Health Research Institute
Title:Assistant Professor/Scientist
[Clinical Session Presentation] This paper presents some of the findings from the study of an ?in-reach? model of discharge planning. In this model, the discharge planner is based with the community based services, and visits the hospital daily to meet with all admitted clients to offer discharge services. The model is designed to provide seamless care to people leaving hospital after a mental health admission.  A program evaluation strategy was used to evaluate the effectiveness of this care model for clients and for the agencies involved. Participants (n=36) were enrolled over a 7 month period. They were interviewed at enrollment, at one month post-discharge and at 6 months post-discharge. This paper focuses on the qualitative findings from the study. Responses to open ended questions regarding the discharge experience were analyzed using Leininger?s ethnographic method (1985). Participants were asked to describe their discharge and follow-up care, what was helpful, what was not helpful, and in what ways did they feel they still needed help.  While participants reported receiving regular follow-up care form a general practitioner, a psychiatrist and/or a case manager, many identified a desire to have some form of counselling or psychotherapy in addition to the supports that were in place. Specific areas were identified included stress management, anger management, employment/vocational counselling, and substance abuse counselling. A few people also identified a need for help with developing social skills so they could increase the amount of social support in their lives. The information provided from the consumer perspective is helpful in evaluating and improving discharge planning processes and care provided.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity-Based Discharge Planning: Consumer Perspectivesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147088-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Community-Based Discharge Planning: Consumer Perspectives</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jensen, Elsabeth, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">York University/Lawson Health Research Institute</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor/Scientist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ejensen@yorku.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical Session Presentation] This paper presents some of the findings from the study of an ?in-reach? model of discharge planning. In this model, the discharge planner is based with the community based services, and visits the hospital daily to meet with all admitted clients to offer discharge services. The model is designed to provide seamless care to people leaving hospital after a mental health admission.&nbsp; A program evaluation strategy was used to evaluate the effectiveness of this care model for clients and for the agencies involved. Participants (n=36) were enrolled over a 7 month period. They were interviewed at enrollment, at one month post-discharge and at 6 months post-discharge. This paper focuses on the qualitative findings from the study. Responses to open ended questions regarding the discharge experience were analyzed using Leininger?s ethnographic method (1985). Participants were asked to describe their discharge and follow-up care, what was helpful, what was not helpful, and in what ways did they feel they still needed help. &nbsp;While participants reported receiving regular follow-up care form a general practitioner, a psychiatrist and/or a case manager, many identified a desire to have some form of counselling or psychotherapy in addition to the supports that were in place. Specific areas were identified included stress management, anger management, employment/vocational counselling, and substance abuse counselling. A few people also identified a need for help with developing social skills so they could increase the amount of social support in their lives. The information provided from the consumer perspective is helpful in evaluating and improving discharge planning processes and care provided.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:29:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:29:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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