Learning Formative Skills of Nursing Practice in an Accelerated Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147096
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Learning Formative Skills of Nursing Practice in an Accelerated Program
Abstract:
Learning Formative Skills of Nursing Practice in an Accelerated Program
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:McNiesh, Susan, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:San Jose State University
Title:Assistant Professor
[Scientific Session Presentation] While fewer people are entering nursing in their early and mid-twenties as was the trend in earlier decades, this trend has been offset by large numbers of people entering the profession in their late twenties and early thirties.  Nursing schools that have started master?s entry programs or second baccalaureate degree programs have found large applicant pools, consisting of second degree students who want to make a career change, often from sciences to a more people oriented career. There has been little research on accelerated nursing programs and many schools have not tailored their curricula to meet the needs of this richly experienced group. The goal of this qualitative research study was to describe how students in an accelerated master?s entry program experientially take up the practice of nursing. A specific aim was: What formative experiences do students identify as helping them develop and differentiate their clinical practice? Data from clinical observations and a combination of small group and individual interviews were collected over the first year of study for students (N=19) in an accelerated master?s entry into nursing program. Data were analyzed using interpretive phenomenological methods. Exemplars were used to articulate the formative skills learned through the independent care of a patient. These existential skills, or practical knowledge, included a developing sense of clinical responsibility, ethically driven by individual patients? needs.The results of this research contribute to nursing education by more clearly explicating the shared experience of students in accelerated programs during clinical learning, specifically describing particular situated learning experiences that helped students develop and differentiate their individual clinical experiences. Uncovering this taken for granted background gives new direction in theoretical and clinical nursing education, especially for accelerated and condensed programs, by articulating what it looks like to take on clinical responsibility from the inside of providing care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLearning Formative Skills of Nursing Practice in an Accelerated Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147096-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Learning Formative Skills of Nursing Practice in an Accelerated Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McNiesh, Susan, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">San Jose State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smcniesh@son.sjsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] While fewer people are entering nursing in their early and mid-twenties as was the trend in earlier decades, this trend has been offset by large numbers of people entering the profession in their late twenties and early thirties. &nbsp;Nursing schools that have started master?s entry programs or second baccalaureate degree programs have found large applicant pools, consisting of second degree students who want to make a career change, often from sciences to a more people oriented career. There has been little research on accelerated nursing programs and many schools have not tailored their curricula to meet the needs of this richly experienced group. The goal of this qualitative research study was to describe how students in an accelerated master?s entry program experientially take up the practice of nursing. A specific aim was: What formative experiences do students identify as helping them develop and differentiate their clinical practice? Data from clinical observations and a combination of small group and individual interviews were collected over the first year of study for students (N=19) in an accelerated master?s entry into nursing program. Data were analyzed using interpretive phenomenological methods. Exemplars were used to articulate the formative skills learned through the independent care of a patient. These existential skills, or practical knowledge, included a developing sense of clinical responsibility, ethically driven by individual patients? needs.The results of this research contribute to nursing education by more clearly explicating the shared experience of students in accelerated programs during clinical learning, specifically describing particular situated learning experiences that helped students develop and differentiate their individual clinical experiences. Uncovering this taken for granted background gives new direction in theoretical and clinical nursing education, especially for accelerated and condensed programs, by articulating what it looks like to take on clinical responsibility from the inside of providing care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:29:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:29:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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