2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147125
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Correlates of Symptoms in Mechanically Ventilated Patients
Abstract:
Correlates of Symptoms in Mechanically Ventilated Patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Siela, Debra, DNSc, CCRN, CCNS, APRN, BC, RRT
P.I. Institution Name:Ball State University/Ball Memorial Hospital
Title:Assistant Professor/Clinical Nurse Specialist
Co-Authors:Renee Samples Twibell, DNS, RN; Mohammed Hosam Aldin Baccora, MD; Pamela Anderson, BS, RN, CCRN
Research suggests that many patients who are receiving mechanical ventilation perceive high levels of anxiety, discomfort, dyspnea, and fatigue. In addition, limited research findings indicate that mechanically ventilated patients with large abdomens have much difficulty in spontaneous ventilation, ventilator weaning, and tolerating mechanical ventilation. The purpose of this study was to explore correlates of anxiety, discomfort, dyspnea, and fatigue perceptions in a sample of critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation. The theoretical framework for the study was Neuman's System Model (1995) which guides research with clients who are experiencing complex stressors. In addition, the UCSF Symptom Management Model (2001) was used to aid in interpreting symptom perceptions. Three data collection forms were used: Confusion Assessment Method (CAM-ICU) (Ely et al, 2001), Physiological Assessment of Intubated Patients (PAIP) (Twibell, Siela, Baccora & Anderson, 2002) and four visually analogue scales (VAS) to measure dyspnea, fatigue, anxiety, and comfort. Data from the PAIP included age, multiple hemodynamic and respiratory parameters, length of time on ventilation, and medical diagnoses. Participants were placed in four different positions in the bed which included the standard head of bed at 30 degrees, 45 degrees, 45 degrees in reverse trendelenberg, and 90 degrees. After ten minutes in each position, measures were taken and recorded on the PAIP. Patients were asked in each position to rate their level of anxiety, dyspnea, fatigue, and comfort on the VAS. Initial data analysis suggests that most patients perceive high levels of discomfort in any of the four positions. Participants perceive moderate fatigue more so at 90 degrees. Dyspnea and anxiety are perceived at lower levels of intensity than discomfort or fatigue. The identification of the correlates of these four perceptions in mechanically ventilated patients with large abdomens can enable the nurse to plan interventions to assist with their management.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCorrelates of Symptoms in Mechanically Ventilated Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147125-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Correlates of Symptoms in Mechanically Ventilated Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Siela, Debra, DNSc, CCRN, CCNS, APRN, BC, RRT</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ball State University/Ball Memorial Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor/Clinical Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dsiela@bsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Renee Samples Twibell, DNS, RN; Mohammed Hosam Aldin Baccora, MD; Pamela Anderson, BS, RN, CCRN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research suggests that many patients who are receiving mechanical ventilation perceive high levels of anxiety, discomfort, dyspnea, and fatigue. In addition, limited research findings indicate that mechanically ventilated patients with large abdomens have much difficulty in spontaneous ventilation, ventilator weaning, and tolerating mechanical ventilation. The purpose of this study was to explore correlates of anxiety, discomfort, dyspnea, and fatigue perceptions in a sample of critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation. The theoretical framework for the study was Neuman's System Model (1995) which guides research with clients who are experiencing complex stressors. In addition, the UCSF Symptom Management Model (2001) was used to aid in interpreting symptom perceptions. Three data collection forms were used: Confusion Assessment Method (CAM-ICU) (Ely et al, 2001), Physiological Assessment of Intubated Patients (PAIP) (Twibell, Siela, Baccora &amp; Anderson, 2002) and four visually analogue scales (VAS) to measure dyspnea, fatigue, anxiety, and comfort. Data from the PAIP included age, multiple hemodynamic and respiratory parameters, length of time on ventilation, and medical diagnoses. Participants were placed in four different positions in the bed which included the standard head of bed at 30 degrees, 45 degrees, 45 degrees in reverse trendelenberg, and 90 degrees. After ten minutes in each position, measures were taken and recorded on the PAIP. Patients were asked in each position to rate their level of anxiety, dyspnea, fatigue, and comfort on the VAS. Initial data analysis suggests that most patients perceive high levels of discomfort in any of the four positions. Participants perceive moderate fatigue more so at 90 degrees. Dyspnea and anxiety are perceived at lower levels of intensity than discomfort or fatigue. The identification of the correlates of these four perceptions in mechanically ventilated patients with large abdomens can enable the nurse to plan interventions to assist with their management.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:29:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:29:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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