Beliefs Regarding Use of Complementary and Alternative Therapy Among African American Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147130
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Beliefs Regarding Use of Complementary and Alternative Therapy Among African American Women
Abstract:
Beliefs Regarding Use of Complementary and Alternative Therapy Among African American Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Taylor, Gloria Ann Jones, DSN, RNc
P.I. Institution Name:Kennesaw State University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Ping Hu Johnson, PhD
Problem: Many women are using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies in conjunction with conventional medical treatment for a variety of health problems and prevention/wellness. Nationally, the most frequently used therapies reported are herbal teas, vitamins/nutritional supplementation, and prayer and spiritual healing. Use of CAM by African American women (AAW) is consistent with other ethnic groups. However, little is known regarding their health beliefs about CAM. Methods: AAW attending a local health fair were recruited to complete a 14-item questionnaire, with a 5-point response scale based on the Health Belief Model, prior to receiving CAM education materials and a small incentive. The questionnaire represented the first phase of instrument development. Health belief components assessed were: perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, cues to action, and self-efficacy. Findings: Two hundred fifty-two women, 21 to 72 years of age completed the questionnaire. Of the respondents, 50% believed CAM use: helps prevent illness, decreases the chances of getting the same health problem again, and decreases the seriousness of a disease/illness. For many women opinions of family/friends and the recommendation of a conventional physician would influence their use of CAM. The majority of the women were positive about their ability to manage health problems by using CAM (63%). Discussion: Respondents were confident regarding their ability to use CAM appropriately. However, many women were undecided about their ability to select appropriate CAM therapies for health problems, the efficacy of CAM therapy versus conventional medical treatment, and the cost of using a CAM provider instead of a medical provider. Implications: To provide more effective care, healthcare providers must understand the beliefs of AAW regarding their use of CAM. Both academic and continuing education for nurses should include more content on CAM to better prepare nurses to interface with clients that are CAM users.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBeliefs Regarding Use of Complementary and Alternative Therapy Among African American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147130-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Beliefs Regarding Use of Complementary and Alternative Therapy Among African American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Taylor, Gloria Ann Jones, DSN, RNc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kennesaw State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gtaylor@kennesaw.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ping Hu Johnson, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Many women are using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies in conjunction with conventional medical treatment for a variety of health problems and prevention/wellness. Nationally, the most frequently used therapies reported are herbal teas, vitamins/nutritional supplementation, and prayer and spiritual healing. Use of CAM by African American women (AAW) is consistent with other ethnic groups. However, little is known regarding their health beliefs about CAM. Methods: AAW attending a local health fair were recruited to complete a 14-item questionnaire, with a 5-point response scale based on the Health Belief Model, prior to receiving CAM education materials and a small incentive. The questionnaire represented the first phase of instrument development. Health belief components assessed were: perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, cues to action, and self-efficacy. Findings: Two hundred fifty-two women, 21 to 72 years of age completed the questionnaire. Of the respondents, 50% believed CAM use: helps prevent illness, decreases the chances of getting the same health problem again, and decreases the seriousness of a disease/illness. For many women opinions of family/friends and the recommendation of a conventional physician would influence their use of CAM. The majority of the women were positive about their ability to manage health problems by using CAM (63%). Discussion: Respondents were confident regarding their ability to use CAM appropriately. However, many women were undecided about their ability to select appropriate CAM therapies for health problems, the efficacy of CAM therapy versus conventional medical treatment, and the cost of using a CAM provider instead of a medical provider. Implications: To provide more effective care, healthcare providers must understand the beliefs of AAW regarding their use of CAM. Both academic and continuing education for nurses should include more content on CAM to better prepare nurses to interface with clients that are CAM users.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:29:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:29:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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