2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147132
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Novice Nurses in Role Transition
Abstract:
Novice Nurses in Role Transition
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Twibell, Renee Semples, DNS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Ball State University/Ball Memorial Hospital
Title:Associate Professor, Faculty Associate
Co-Authors:Debra Siela, DNSc, CCRN, CCNS, APRN, BC, RRT; Tammy Lightner, BSN, RN, CCRN, CVN; Erin E. Rassel, BSN
The transition of novice nurses into clinical practice is commonly perceived as stressful. However, prior research has yielded (a) no consensus on the stressful aspects of the role transition, (b) little consensus on helpful interventions to avoid attrition among new nurses, (c) few hypotheses for testing, and (d) no theory to guide further study of the transition. The purposes of this exploratory study were to develop a taxonomy of meanings related to role transition among novice nurses and to examine the fit between the data and the Synergy Model (Curley, 1998). To date, the Synergy Model has only been applied when matching patients' needs with nurses' abilities. This study explored extending the model to guide the matching of novices' needs with preceptors' abilities. Twelve senior baccalaureate nursing students assigned to critical care clinical experiences participated in four focus group interviews. Data were transcribed verbatim. Data analysis occurred in two phases. First, using Spradley's (1979) ethnographic analysis approach, a taxonomic structure of meanings was defined. The central theme was that preceptors placed novice nurses ?in the spotlight,? where the potential for failure was overwhelming. Four taxonomic domains were identified as ?people always watching,? helpful interventions, unhelpful actions, and strong negative emotions. Nine sub-domains were identified. Hypotheses for further research focused on how specific interventions may help manage negative emotions and improve retention. Secondly, data were examined for fit with the Synergy Model. Some tenets of the model were supported, while other components did not fit with nurse-nurse interfaces. Additional concepts appropriate for matching novice nurses with preceptors were proposed as an extension to the model. The findings provide a rich, descriptive taxonomy of meanings related to the transition of novice nurses' into practice, the formulation of hypotheses, and a contribution to theory relevant to the role transition.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNovice Nurses in Role Transitionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147132-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Novice Nurses in Role Transition</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Twibell, Renee Semples, DNS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ball State University/Ball Memorial Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor, Faculty Associate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rtwibell@bsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Debra Siela, DNSc, CCRN, CCNS, APRN, BC, RRT; Tammy Lightner, BSN, RN, CCRN, CVN; Erin E. Rassel, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The transition of novice nurses into clinical practice is commonly perceived as stressful. However, prior research has yielded (a) no consensus on the stressful aspects of the role transition, (b) little consensus on helpful interventions to avoid attrition among new nurses, (c) few hypotheses for testing, and (d) no theory to guide further study of the transition. The purposes of this exploratory study were to develop a taxonomy of meanings related to role transition among novice nurses and to examine the fit between the data and the Synergy Model (Curley, 1998). To date, the Synergy Model has only been applied when matching patients' needs with nurses' abilities. This study explored extending the model to guide the matching of novices' needs with preceptors' abilities. Twelve senior baccalaureate nursing students assigned to critical care clinical experiences participated in four focus group interviews. Data were transcribed verbatim. Data analysis occurred in two phases. First, using Spradley's (1979) ethnographic analysis approach, a taxonomic structure of meanings was defined. The central theme was that preceptors placed novice nurses ?in the spotlight,? where the potential for failure was overwhelming. Four taxonomic domains were identified as ?people always watching,? helpful interventions, unhelpful actions, and strong negative emotions. Nine sub-domains were identified. Hypotheses for further research focused on how specific interventions may help manage negative emotions and improve retention. Secondly, data were examined for fit with the Synergy Model. Some tenets of the model were supported, while other components did not fit with nurse-nurse interfaces. Additional concepts appropriate for matching novice nurses with preceptors were proposed as an extension to the model. The findings provide a rich, descriptive taxonomy of meanings related to the transition of novice nurses' into practice, the formulation of hypotheses, and a contribution to theory relevant to the role transition.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:29:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:29:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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