Crying Alone With My Child: The Meaning of Parenting a Young Child With Bipolar Disorder

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147133
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Crying Alone With My Child: The Meaning of Parenting a Young Child With Bipolar Disorder
Abstract:
Crying Alone With My Child: The Meaning of Parenting a Young Child With Bipolar Disorder
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Wade, Josephine, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Tennessee in Knoxville
Title:Assistant Professor
Recent years have seen a rise in the number of children diagnosed at an early age with bipolar disorder. Parents must assume the responsibility for medication management and behavioral monitoring. This, combined with a changing political arena, may mean continued stress and burden for caregivers and parents of children diagnosed with a psychiatric illness. The purpose of this existential phenomenological study was to describe the lived experience of parents of children ages 6-11 years, who are diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder. An existential phenomenological research method was used. Non directive, in depth, taped interviews were conducted with a volunteer sample of 10 parents. The narratives were analyzed for common themes of experience by the researcher and an interdisciplinary research team. A thematic structure of four interrelated themes emerged. These themes were: (1) ?it's always, always: engulfed in chaos"; (2) "my hands are tied: scared and frustrated?; (3) ?on the other side of a dark curtain: alone and shunned away?; and (4) ?I cry so many tears on this child: it hurts but it's worth it.? The themes stood out against the contextual ground of others, primarily the child and professionals in the educational and health systems. The parents in this study experienced unrelenting fear, frustration, loneliness, and hurt. The health and educational systems proved to be inadequate. However, the parents were strong, fighting for the rights of their child, the prime consideration of their lives. Examined from the perspective of family nursing care for a chronically ill child, the study informs nurses of ways to support parents. The findings provide clear insight into the interactions that the families had with the environment, the most significant finding for family nurses being the absence of the nurse. Discussion of the findings includes implications for family health, nursing and health policy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCrying Alone With My Child: The Meaning of Parenting a Young Child With Bipolar Disorderen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147133-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Crying Alone With My Child: The Meaning of Parenting a Young Child With Bipolar Disorder</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wade, Josephine, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Tennessee in Knoxville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jwade8@utk.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Recent years have seen a rise in the number of children diagnosed at an early age with bipolar disorder. Parents must assume the responsibility for medication management and behavioral monitoring. This, combined with a changing political arena, may mean continued stress and burden for caregivers and parents of children diagnosed with a psychiatric illness. The purpose of this existential phenomenological study was to describe the lived experience of parents of children ages 6-11 years, who are diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder. An existential phenomenological research method was used. Non directive, in depth, taped interviews were conducted with a volunteer sample of 10 parents. The narratives were analyzed for common themes of experience by the researcher and an interdisciplinary research team. A thematic structure of four interrelated themes emerged. These themes were: (1) ?it's always, always: engulfed in chaos&quot;; (2) &quot;my hands are tied: scared and frustrated?; (3) ?on the other side of a dark curtain: alone and shunned away?; and (4) ?I cry so many tears on this child: it hurts but it's worth it.? The themes stood out against the contextual ground of others, primarily the child and professionals in the educational and health systems. The parents in this study experienced unrelenting fear, frustration, loneliness, and hurt. The health and educational systems proved to be inadequate. However, the parents were strong, fighting for the rights of their child, the prime consideration of their lives. Examined from the perspective of family nursing care for a chronically ill child, the study informs nurses of ways to support parents. The findings provide clear insight into the interactions that the families had with the environment, the most significant finding for family nurses being the absence of the nurse. Discussion of the findings includes implications for family health, nursing and health policy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:29:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:29:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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