Nurse Practitioners' and Physicians Views of NPs as Providers of Primary Care to Veterans

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147170
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Practitioners' and Physicians Views of NPs as Providers of Primary Care to Veterans
Abstract:
Nurse Practitioners' and Physicians Views of NPs as Providers of Primary Care to Veterans
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Fletcher, Carol E., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Veterans Health Administration (11-H)
Title:Research Health Scientist Specialist
Co-Authors:S. Jill Baker, MA, MSW; Pamela J. Reeves, MD; Julie C. Lowery, PhD
[Evidence-based presentation] We report quantitative and qualitative findings from our study involving primary care nurse practitioners (NPs) (n=74) and physicians (MDs) (n=79) employed in 7 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical centers. There was a range of 3.6 to 9.9 NPs per 10,000 patients at the study sites. Subjects responded to a survey containing 26 questions for MDs and 28 for NPs.  The last 4 questions to each group were open-ended. The study objectives were to examine both groups' perceptions regarding the role of NPs and to identify factors that may be contributing to the inefficient use of NPs. NPs saw their role as one of autonomous practice with physician back-up as needed, while MDs pictured a role akin to a physician extender.  Both the NPs and MDs shared at least some concerns about the expectations for NPs, MDs at a significantly higher rate. Most of the physicians did not think NPs could provide adequate primary care to veterans who tend to be sicker and have more comorbidities than the average patient. Yet both groups considered their relationships to be collegial. MDs particularly valued NPs teaching and interpersonal skills leading to greater patient satisfaction. The study also highlighted the need for physicians to have adequately protected time to support NPs when the NP recognizes that care of the patient is beyond her/his scope of practice and training. Although this was a VHA study, due to the large numbers of citizens without adequate health insurance, it is to be expected that the findings may apply to NPs' roles as providers of primary care to the civilian population as well. Better understanding and support of the NPs' role by physicians and administrators is essential in attempts to translate research into practice by using more NPs to improve patient care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse Practitioners' and Physicians Views of NPs as Providers of Primary Care to Veteransen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147170-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurse Practitioners' and Physicians Views of NPs as Providers of Primary Care to Veterans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fletcher, Carol E., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Veterans Health Administration (11-H)</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Health Scientist Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carol.fletcher@med.va.gov</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. Jill Baker, MA, MSW; Pamela J. Reeves, MD; Julie C. Lowery, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based presentation] We report quantitative and qualitative findings from our study involving primary care nurse practitioners (NPs) (n=74) and physicians (MDs) (n=79) employed in 7 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical centers. There was a range of 3.6 to 9.9 NPs per 10,000 patients at the study sites. Subjects responded to a survey containing 26 questions for MDs and 28 for NPs.&nbsp; The last 4 questions to each group were open-ended.&nbsp;The study objectives were to examine both groups' perceptions regarding the role of NPs and to identify factors that may be contributing to the inefficient use of NPs. NPs saw their role as one of autonomous practice with physician back-up as needed, while MDs pictured a role akin to a physician extender.&nbsp; Both the NPs and MDs shared at least some concerns about the expectations for NPs, MDs at a significantly higher rate.&nbsp;Most of the physicians did not think NPs could provide adequate primary care to veterans who tend to be sicker and have more comorbidities than the average patient. Yet both groups considered their relationships to be collegial. MDs particularly valued NPs teaching and interpersonal skills leading to greater patient satisfaction. The study also highlighted the need for physicians to have adequately protected time to support NPs when the NP recognizes that care of the patient is beyond her/his scope of practice and training.&nbsp;Although this was a VHA study, due to the large numbers of citizens without adequate health insurance, it is to be expected that the findings may apply to NPs' roles as providers of primary care to the civilian population as well.&nbsp;Better understanding and support of the NPs' role by physicians and administrators is essential in attempts to translate research into practice by using more NPs to improve patient care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:29:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:29:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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