Learning Outcomes Associated with the Use of High Fidelity Human Patient Simulation as a Teaching Strategy in Undergraduate Nursing Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147203
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Learning Outcomes Associated with the Use of High Fidelity Human Patient Simulation as a Teaching Strategy in Undergraduate Nursing Education
Abstract:
Learning Outcomes Associated with the Use of High Fidelity Human Patient Simulation as a Teaching Strategy in Undergraduate Nursing Education
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Nininger, Jami Michelle, MS, RN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:The Ohio State University
Title:Instructor
Co-Authors:Carolyn Schubert, MSN, RN
[Clinical session research presentation] Educators are facing a multitude of challenges as they prepare undergraduate nursing students for professional practice. The current academic environment is faced with exploding student enrollment, limited patient care opportunities and faculty shortages (Simpson & Courtney, 2002).  Additionally, the current generation of learners demands innovative, engaging strategies to acquire knowledge.  These factors have lead many academic nursing programs to the use of high fidelity patient simulators as a strategy to educate students. The use of human patient simulation provides students with multi-sensory, hands on, engaging patient care experiences within an environment that emulates that of the health care setting.  Students then learn in an environment that is safe, both for the patient and the learner. However, the cost associated with the use of human patient simulation is not nominal. Therefore, learning outcomes associated with this innovative strategy must be evaluated to establish true benefit (Nerhing & Lashley, 2004). Preliminary data and methods used to evaluate learning outcomes associated with the use of human patient simulation will be discussed. Additionally, this session will provide information regarding lessons learned and future directions for evaluating student learning associated with the use of human patient simulation as a strategy for teaching undergraduate nursing students. Nerhing, W. & Lashley R.  (2004). Current use and opinions regarding human patient simulation in nursing education: An International survey. Nursing Education Perspectives, 25, 244-248.Simpson, E. & Courtney, M.  (2002). Critical incident nursing management using human patient simulators.  Nursing Education Perspectives, 23, 129-132.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLearning Outcomes Associated with the Use of High Fidelity Human Patient Simulation as a Teaching Strategy in Undergraduate Nursing Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147203-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Learning Outcomes Associated with the Use of High Fidelity Human Patient Simulation as a Teaching Strategy in Undergraduate Nursing Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nininger, Jami Michelle, MS, RN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Ohio State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jnininger@con.ohio-state.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carolyn Schubert, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] Educators are facing a multitude of challenges as they prepare undergraduate nursing students for professional practice.&nbsp;The current academic environment is faced with exploding student enrollment, limited patient care opportunities and faculty shortages (Simpson &amp; Courtney, 2002).&nbsp; Additionally, the current generation of learners demands innovative, engaging strategies to acquire knowledge.&nbsp; These factors have lead many academic nursing programs to the use of high fidelity patient simulators as a strategy to educate students.&nbsp;The use of human patient simulation provides students with multi-sensory, hands on, engaging patient care experiences within an environment that emulates that of the health care setting.&nbsp; Students then learn in an environment that is safe, both for the patient and the learner. However, the cost associated with the use of human patient simulation is not nominal.&nbsp;Therefore, learning outcomes associated with this innovative strategy must be evaluated to establish true benefit (Nerhing &amp; Lashley, 2004).&nbsp;Preliminary data and methods used to evaluate learning outcomes associated with the use of human patient simulation will be discussed. Additionally, this session will provide information regarding lessons learned and future directions for evaluating student learning associated with the use of human patient simulation as a strategy for teaching undergraduate nursing students.&nbsp;Nerhing, W. &amp; Lashley R.&nbsp; (2004).&nbsp;Current use and opinions regarding human patient simulation in nursing education:&nbsp;An International survey.&nbsp;Nursing Education Perspectives, 25, 244-248.Simpson, E. &amp; Courtney, M.&nbsp; (2002). Critical incident nursing management using human patient simulators.&nbsp; Nursing Education Perspectives, 23, 129-132.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:30:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:30:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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