2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147236
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interconception Counseling after a Preterm Delivery
Abstract:
Interconception Counseling after a Preterm Delivery
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Albertus, Kari, BSN, RNC
P.I. Institution Name:Christiana Care Health Services
Title:Staff Nurse
Co-Authors:Michele K. Savin, MSN, NNP; Melanie Chichester, BSN, RNC; Deborah B. Ehrenthal, MD, FACP; Barbara Dean, BSN, RNC; David A. Paul, MD
[Scientific Session Presentation] After a preterm delivery, when women would be most receptive to preconception counseling is unknown. Health care providers should counsel women who have had a preterm birth about risks associated with future pregnancies, and improving chances of good outcomes. The objective of this study is to pinpoint optimal timing of interpregnancy preconception care after a preterm birth.Up to 50% of pregnancies in the United States today remain unplanned (Finer & Henshaw, 2006). One of the greatest risk factors for preterm birth is prior preterm birth (Stubblefied, et al, 208). After a preterm birth, health care providers should counsel their patient about pregnancy spacing (Conde-Agudelo, 2005; Smith, Pell, & Dobbie, 2003), progesterone use (Jack, et al, 2008), and ways to reduce risks of other poor outcomes (Freda, 2006). It is not known when women would be most receptive to such a discussion. Mothers of preterm infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit were surveyed regarding when they would like to receive counseling and information regarding another pregnancy, and with whom they wanted to speak. Twenty surveys were returned. Demographics include 60% Caucasian and 30% African American, with 80% having some level of college education, and 31 weeks mean gestation at delivery. 76% desired another pregnancy, but <20% had received any guidance from their obstetrician at the time they responded. More than 50% wanted to receive information beginning at the 4-6 week postpartum visit, and 80% wanted it from their primary obstetric provider. Limitations of the study include the small sample size.Preconception counseling may be highly effective in reducing pregnancy risks (Moos, et al, 2008). After a preterm birth, women considering another pregnancy are very receptive to preconception counseling beginning at the 4-6 week postpartum visit. Future research should seek a larger, more diverse group of women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInterconception Counseling after a Preterm Deliveryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147236-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Interconception Counseling after a Preterm Delivery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Albertus, Kari, BSN, RNC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Christiana Care Health Services</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Staff Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">karialbertus@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michele K. Savin, MSN, NNP; Melanie Chichester, BSN, RNC; Deborah B. Ehrenthal, MD, FACP; Barbara Dean, BSN, RNC; David A. Paul, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] After a preterm delivery, when women would be most receptive to preconception counseling is unknown. Health care providers should counsel women who have had a preterm birth about risks associated with future pregnancies, and improving chances of good outcomes. The objective of this study is to pinpoint optimal timing of interpregnancy preconception care after a preterm birth.Up to 50% of pregnancies in the United States today remain unplanned (Finer &amp; Henshaw, 2006). One of the greatest risk factors for preterm birth is prior preterm birth (Stubblefied, et al, 208). After a preterm birth, health care providers should counsel their patient about pregnancy spacing (Conde-Agudelo, 2005; Smith, Pell, &amp; Dobbie, 2003), progesterone use (Jack, et al, 2008), and ways to reduce risks of other poor outcomes (Freda, 2006). It is not known when women would be most receptive to such a discussion. Mothers of preterm infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit were surveyed regarding when they would like to receive counseling and information regarding another pregnancy, and with whom they wanted to speak. Twenty surveys were returned. Demographics include 60% Caucasian and 30% African American, with 80% having some level of college education, and 31 weeks mean gestation at delivery. 76% desired another pregnancy, but &lt;20% had received any guidance from their obstetrician at the time they responded. More than 50% wanted to receive information beginning at the 4-6 week postpartum visit, and 80% wanted it from their primary obstetric provider. Limitations of the study include the small sample size.Preconception counseling may be highly effective in reducing pregnancy risks (Moos, et al, 2008). After a preterm birth, women considering another pregnancy are very receptive to preconception counseling beginning at the 4-6 week postpartum visit. Future research should seek a larger, more diverse group of women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:30:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:30:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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