The Use of Simulated Clinical Experiences to Improve Competency in the Novice Anesthesia Provider

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147251
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Use of Simulated Clinical Experiences to Improve Competency in the Novice Anesthesia Provider
Abstract:
The Use of Simulated Clinical Experiences to Improve Competency in the Novice Anesthesia Provider
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Detty Oswaks, Jill Suzanne, CRNA, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:Old Dominion University
Title:Director, Nurse Anesthesia Program
Co-Authors:Jonathan Lee Sorenson, CRNA, DNSc
Introduction: This study explored the possible existence of a relationship between novice anesthesia providers and simulated clinical experiences. Fifteen nurse anesthesia students from a mid-Western University, and fifteen nurse anesthesia students from a mid-Atlantic University comprised the study sample. Inclusion criteria required that the students had successfully completed two semesters of didactic/theoretical course work and were void of any clinical anesthesia experience. A human patient simulator (HPS) was employed to evaluate clinical competencies. Methods: This study was a quasi-experimental design comprising one group of subjects followed longitudinally. The study sample of novice anesthesia providers was assessed using Benner’s Levels of Proficiency in Nursing Model. Parallel studies were conducted simultaneously at a mid-Western and at a mid-Atlantic Universities. Statistical analysis was performed by Chi-Square (x2) measurements. Results: Intubation success by gender revealed statistical significance (p=.009, .05a) for female students. Post simulation and post clinical experiences found higher success rates than pre simulation attempts. When examining the number of attempts for successful intubation statistical significance was established (p=.033, 05a). Statistical significance (p=.017, 05a) was noted regarding the assignment of physical risk for the sample population. Conclusions: The results of this study led to the following conclusions: 1. The success of oral tracheal intubation improved with clinical simulation. 2. Students found it difficult to achieve mask ventilation with a simulator after clinical experiences. 3. ASA physical status assignment is a subjective measurement. 4. The novice anesthesia providers were ‘competent’ in the mask ventilation skill, by criteria, it was noted that many had an audible leak. 5. Novice anesthesia providers related that the human patient simulator (HPS) was an intimidating experience, but worthy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Use of Simulated Clinical Experiences to Improve Competency in the Novice Anesthesia Provideren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147251-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Use of Simulated Clinical Experiences to Improve Competency in the Novice Anesthesia Provider</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Detty Oswaks, Jill Suzanne, CRNA, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Old Dominion University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director, Nurse Anesthesia Program</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jdettyos@odu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jonathan Lee Sorenson, CRNA, DNSc</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: This study explored the possible existence of a relationship between novice anesthesia providers and simulated clinical experiences. Fifteen nurse anesthesia students from a mid-Western University, and fifteen nurse anesthesia students from a mid-Atlantic University comprised the study sample. Inclusion criteria required that the students had successfully completed two semesters of didactic/theoretical course work and were void of any clinical anesthesia experience. A human patient simulator (HPS) was employed to evaluate clinical competencies. Methods: This study was a quasi-experimental design comprising one group of subjects followed longitudinally. The study sample of novice anesthesia providers was assessed using Benner&rsquo;s Levels of Proficiency in Nursing Model. Parallel studies were conducted simultaneously at a mid-Western and at a mid-Atlantic Universities. Statistical analysis was performed by Chi-Square (x2) measurements. Results: Intubation success by gender revealed statistical significance (p=.009, .05a) for female students. Post simulation and post clinical experiences found higher success rates than pre simulation attempts. When examining the number of attempts for successful intubation statistical significance was established (p=.033, 05a). Statistical significance (p=.017, 05a) was noted regarding the assignment of physical risk for the sample population. Conclusions: The results of this study led to the following conclusions: 1. The success of oral tracheal intubation improved with clinical simulation. 2. Students found it difficult to achieve mask ventilation with a simulator after clinical experiences. 3. ASA physical status assignment is a subjective measurement. 4. The novice anesthesia providers were &lsquo;competent&rsquo; in the mask ventilation skill, by criteria, it was noted that many had an audible leak. 5. Novice anesthesia providers related that the human patient simulator (HPS) was an intimidating experience, but worthy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:30:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:30:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.