Adherence, Quality of Life, and Clinical Response in Persons with HIV Infection

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147262
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adherence, Quality of Life, and Clinical Response in Persons with HIV Infection
Abstract:
Adherence, Quality of Life, and Clinical Response in Persons with HIV Infection
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Erlen, Judith A., RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing
Title:professor
Co-Authors:Susan Sereika, PhD; Mary Pat Mellors, RN, PhD; Jacqueline Dunbar-Jacob, RN, PhD; Susan Hunt, MD; Christopher M. Ryan, PhD; John Mellors, MD
Objective: Purpose was to examine relationships between adherence to antiretroviral therapy, health related quality of life and clinical response. Design: This is a descriptive correlation study. Population, Sample, Setting: Patients infected with HIV (PWHIV), taking antiretroviral medications, and without HIV dementia were recruited through a university based clinic, community settings, and self-referral. The sample included 215 PWHIV (145 males, 70 females; 117 White, 73 African-American, 24 multi-racial/other). Ages ranged from 24- 61 years (mean=40.5 years). Concept or Variables Studied Together: Variables included adherence (electronic event monitors (EEMs), Morisky Self-report Adherence Scale), clinical response (viral load, CD4 T-cell count), and health-related quality of life (MOS-HIV, Satisfaction with Life Scale). Methods: Following enrollment, subjects used the EEM on a randomly selected antiretroviral medication for 30 days. Subjects completed paper and pencil tests. Clinical response data were obtained from medical records. EEM data were downloaded. Data were analyzed using Pearson r correlation coefficient. Findings: Using EEMs adherence was 65%, taking prescribed number of doses; 47%, correct intake; 29%, days with no medication taken; 24%, near optimal inter-administration intervals; and 15%, days with prescribed number of doses and optimal inter-dose intervals. Self-reported adherence (Mean = 9.77) showed statistically significant correlations: CD4 T-cells = .180, viral load = -.274, satisfaction with life = .205, MOS-overall health = .315, and MOS-quality of life = .177. Percent correct administrations was significantly correlated with viral load (r = -.164); percent days with correct dose was significantly correlated with satisfaction with life (r = .152). Conclusions: Using EEMs the adherence of PWHIV is poor when compared to the 95% level identified as necessary for good clinical outcomes. Self-reported adherence is related to improved clinical outcomes and quality of life. Implications: Additional research is necessary to examine factors influencing adherence and test theory-based interventions designed to promote adherence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdherence, Quality of Life, and Clinical Response in Persons with HIV Infectionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147262-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adherence, Quality of Life, and Clinical Response in Persons with HIV Infection</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Erlen, Judith A., RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jae001@pitt.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan Sereika, PhD; Mary Pat Mellors, RN, PhD; Jacqueline Dunbar-Jacob, RN, PhD; Susan Hunt, MD; Christopher M. Ryan, PhD; John Mellors, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Purpose was to examine relationships between adherence to antiretroviral therapy, health related quality of life and clinical response. Design: This is a descriptive correlation study. Population, Sample, Setting: Patients infected with HIV (PWHIV), taking antiretroviral medications, and without HIV dementia were recruited through a university based clinic, community settings, and self-referral. The sample included 215 PWHIV (145 males, 70 females; 117 White, 73 African-American, 24 multi-racial/other). Ages ranged from 24- 61 years (mean=40.5 years). Concept or Variables Studied Together: Variables included adherence (electronic event monitors (EEMs), Morisky Self-report Adherence Scale), clinical response (viral load, CD4 T-cell count), and health-related quality of life (MOS-HIV, Satisfaction with Life Scale). Methods: Following enrollment, subjects used the EEM on a randomly selected antiretroviral medication for 30 days. Subjects completed paper and pencil tests. Clinical response data were obtained from medical records. EEM data were downloaded. Data were analyzed using Pearson r correlation coefficient. Findings: Using EEMs adherence was 65%, taking prescribed number of doses; 47%, correct intake; 29%, days with no medication taken; 24%, near optimal inter-administration intervals; and 15%, days with prescribed number of doses and optimal inter-dose intervals. Self-reported adherence (Mean = 9.77) showed statistically significant correlations: CD4 T-cells = .180, viral load = -.274, satisfaction with life = .205, MOS-overall health = .315, and MOS-quality of life = .177. Percent correct administrations was significantly correlated with viral load (r = -.164); percent days with correct dose was significantly correlated with satisfaction with life (r = .152). Conclusions: Using EEMs the adherence of PWHIV is poor when compared to the 95% level identified as necessary for good clinical outcomes. Self-reported adherence is related to improved clinical outcomes and quality of life. Implications: Additional research is necessary to examine factors influencing adherence and test theory-based interventions designed to promote adherence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:30:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:30:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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