The Impact of a Tri-Hospital Merger On Registered Nurses’ Intent to Turnover

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147275
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of a Tri-Hospital Merger On Registered Nurses’ Intent to Turnover
Abstract:
The Impact of a Tri-Hospital Merger On Registered Nurses’ Intent to Turnover
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Jones, Janice M., RN, PhD, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:University at Buffalo
Title:Assistant Clinical Professor
Intent to turnover is an important variable to consider during hospital mergers, acquisitions and restructuring. This study is among the first to investigate differing organizational levels of this construct in relation to professional nursing during a tri-hospital merger process. All full time and part time registered nurses employed on general nursing units at three hospitals involved in a merger process completed the Intent to Turnover Scale adapted from the Michigan Organizational Assessment Questionnaire. Interviews were also conducted. The sample included 98 registered nurses, primarily female, with six months to twenty-six years of tenure.Hospital A is the acquired hospital while Hospitals B and C are considered the acquiring hospitals of the newly formed Corporate System. Nurses at all three hospitals had no strong feelings about either staying or leaving their present position although the interviews demonstrated that nurses with greater tenure wanted to stay within the newly formed umbrella Corporate System organization because of benefits and seniority concerns. Organizational commitment to individual hospital and to the Corporate System along with job satisfaction were found to be inversely correlated to intent to turnover. The ability or inability of finding another position within the Corporate System did not impact on the decision to stay or leave by any of the nurses at all three hospitals. Nurses who were older, divorced, had children were more likely to stay within their own hospital than younger nurses who were either single or married but had no children. Although a merged healthcare system provided more job opportunities for nurses, other factors played a significantly important role in their intent to stay or leave their present position, their particular hospital, and the merged Corporate System. “Golden handcuffs” such as benefits and vacation time prompted the nurses to stay in their present position or within the Corporate System.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of a Tri-Hospital Merger On Registered Nurses’ Intent to Turnoveren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147275-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Impact of a Tri-Hospital Merger On Registered Nurses&rsquo; Intent to Turnover</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jones, Janice M., RN, PhD, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University at Buffalo</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Clinical Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jsylakow@buffalo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Intent to turnover is an important variable to consider during hospital mergers, acquisitions and restructuring. This study is among the first to investigate differing organizational levels of this construct in relation to professional nursing during a tri-hospital merger process. All full time and part time registered nurses employed on general nursing units at three hospitals involved in a merger process completed the Intent to Turnover Scale adapted from the Michigan Organizational Assessment Questionnaire. Interviews were also conducted. The sample included 98 registered nurses, primarily female, with six months to twenty-six years of tenure.Hospital A is the acquired hospital while Hospitals B and C are considered the acquiring hospitals of the newly formed Corporate System. Nurses at all three hospitals had no strong feelings about either staying or leaving their present position although the interviews demonstrated that nurses with greater tenure wanted to stay within the newly formed umbrella Corporate System organization because of benefits and seniority concerns. Organizational commitment to individual hospital and to the Corporate System along with job satisfaction were found to be inversely correlated to intent to turnover. The ability or inability of finding another position within the Corporate System did not impact on the decision to stay or leave by any of the nurses at all three hospitals. Nurses who were older, divorced, had children were more likely to stay within their own hospital than younger nurses who were either single or married but had no children. Although a merged healthcare system provided more job opportunities for nurses, other factors played a significantly important role in their intent to stay or leave their present position, their particular hospital, and the merged Corporate System. &ldquo;Golden handcuffs&rdquo; such as benefits and vacation time prompted the nurses to stay in their present position or within the Corporate System.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:30:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:30:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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