2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147289
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Having Opportunities, Producing Hope
Abstract:
Having Opportunities, Producing Hope
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Marcott, Ruth, RNC, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Medical Branch School of Nursing
Title:Associate Dean for Student Affairs/Admissions
Objective: The Having Opportunities, Producing Excellence (HOPE) Program, supported by a Nursing Innovation Grant, was designed to provide early and intensive support services aimed at retention of students who have faced academic challenges in the past. Population, Sample, Setting: In addition to regularly admitted students, 29 junior students were accepted into an upper-division baccalaureate nursing program in a major health science center university. Students met required admission criteria but would traditionally have been placed on a waiting list. The ethnic composition of the group is: Caucasian = 12 (42%); Hispanic/Mexican American = 7 (24%); Black = 7 (24%); Asian/Pacific Islander = 3 (10%). English is a second language for seven (24%) of the students Variables: Relationships are explored between admission data (i.e. GPAs, number of course failures and withdrawals, previous semester credit loads), additional assessment results (i.e. aptitude, learning styles, basic skills), behavioral information obtained after matriculation and student success. Methods: Students with similar characteristics enrolled in this unique three-year nursing program and in the traditional two-year progression are compared. Findings: Key indicators for admission to the special program and student behaviors that support success have emerged. Several students are listed on the Dean’s List. Though 27 students remain in the program, five will repeat a course. Subjective data regarding unexpected benefits will also be discussed. Conclusions: Though somewhat reluctant initially, students repeatedly affirm the benefits of the program. Academically challenging theory courses were distributed in a manner that reduces course workload per semester as students advance to clinical courses. This curriculum design and additional support services can contribute to student success. Implications: Admission of a diverse student population is a goal for nursing schools. Core indicators can assist schools with admission decisions. Identification of successful support approaches can assist schools in reducing attrition rates.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHaving Opportunities, Producing Hopeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147289-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Having Opportunities, Producing Hope</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Marcott, Ruth, RNC, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Medical Branch School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean for Student Affairs/Admissions</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ermarcot@utmb.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The Having Opportunities, Producing Excellence (HOPE) Program, supported by a Nursing Innovation Grant, was designed to provide early and intensive support services aimed at retention of students who have faced academic challenges in the past. Population, Sample, Setting: In addition to regularly admitted students, 29 junior students were accepted into an upper-division baccalaureate nursing program in a major health science center university. Students met required admission criteria but would traditionally have been placed on a waiting list. The ethnic composition of the group is: Caucasian = 12 (42%); Hispanic/Mexican American = 7 (24%); Black = 7 (24%); Asian/Pacific Islander = 3 (10%). English is a second language for seven (24%) of the students Variables: Relationships are explored between admission data (i.e. GPAs, number of course failures and withdrawals, previous semester credit loads), additional assessment results (i.e. aptitude, learning styles, basic skills), behavioral information obtained after matriculation and student success. Methods: Students with similar characteristics enrolled in this unique three-year nursing program and in the traditional two-year progression are compared. Findings: Key indicators for admission to the special program and student behaviors that support success have emerged. Several students are listed on the Dean&rsquo;s List. Though 27 students remain in the program, five will repeat a course. Subjective data regarding unexpected benefits will also be discussed. Conclusions: Though somewhat reluctant initially, students repeatedly affirm the benefits of the program. Academically challenging theory courses were distributed in a manner that reduces course workload per semester as students advance to clinical courses. This curriculum design and additional support services can contribute to student success. Implications: Admission of a diverse student population is a goal for nursing schools. Core indicators can assist schools with admission decisions. Identification of successful support approaches can assist schools in reducing attrition rates.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:30:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:30:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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