Social Problem Solving, African-Americans, and DASH for Blood Pressure Control

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147360
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Social Problem Solving, African-Americans, and DASH for Blood Pressure Control
Abstract:
Social Problem Solving, African-Americans, and DASH for Blood Pressure Control
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Lesley, Marsha, MLIS, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Doctoral Candidate
Hypertension is a serious disease that affects African Americans in epidemic proportions. Adhering to an eating plan called DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) and limiting dietary sodium can reduce blood pressures both in those with, and those at risk for, hypertension. Nutrition knowledge is needed to satisfy information needs about what dietary changes need to be made. However, nutrition knowledge alone may not be sufficient to change dietary behaviors. Problem solving skill may help to establish and maintain new dietary habits. This study is based on the Social Problem Solving Model. The specific aim is to compare dietary problem solving skill between African Americans who complete an on-line educational program called ?DASH to Health? combined with an on-line problem solving training program, and those who complete the educational program only. A randomized two group, posttest design is used in the study. The sample is African Americans, 18 years and older, recruited from a community college campus in Detroit, Michigan. Data collection is currently in progress. Sample size will be 128 (64/group). All participants complete a post-intervention problem solving exercise in which they identify two problems with their own eating habits that could affect their blood pressure and possible solutions to solve each problem. Two weeks later, participants are interviewed by phone to ascertain how they have dealt with the problems since the time of the study. Dietary problem solving skill will be measured by comparing the quantity and quality of solutions identified and implemented. A high quality solution is one that is safe and effective over time. This study may help nurses identify what educational approaches are most helpful when teaching African Americans about lifestyle modification for blood pressure control.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocial Problem Solving, African-Americans, and DASH for Blood Pressure Controlen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147360-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Social Problem Solving, African-Americans, and DASH for Blood Pressure Control</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lesley, Marsha, MLIS, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">marshalesley@comcast.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Hypertension is a serious disease that affects African Americans in epidemic proportions. Adhering to an eating plan called DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) and limiting dietary sodium can reduce blood pressures both in those with, and those at risk for, hypertension. Nutrition knowledge is needed to satisfy information needs about what dietary changes need to be made. However, nutrition knowledge alone may not be sufficient to change dietary behaviors. Problem solving skill may help to establish and maintain new dietary habits. This study is based on the Social Problem Solving Model. The specific aim is to compare dietary problem solving skill between African Americans who complete an on-line educational program called ?DASH to Health? combined with an on-line problem solving training program, and those who complete the educational program only. A randomized two group, posttest design is used in the study. The sample is African Americans, 18 years and older, recruited from a community college campus in Detroit, Michigan. Data collection is currently in progress. Sample size will be 128 (64/group). All participants complete a post-intervention problem solving exercise in which they identify two problems with their own eating habits that could affect their blood pressure and possible solutions to solve each problem. Two weeks later, participants are interviewed by phone to ascertain how they have dealt with the problems since the time of the study. Dietary problem solving skill will be measured by comparing the quantity and quality of solutions identified and implemented. A high quality solution is one that is safe and effective over time. This study may help nurses identify what educational approaches are most helpful when teaching African Americans about lifestyle modification for blood pressure control.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:31:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:31:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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