Nurses' Perceptions of Spiritual Care and Nurses' Spiritual Activity

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147371
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Perceptions of Spiritual Care and Nurses' Spiritual Activity
Abstract:
Nurses' Perceptions of Spiritual Care and Nurses' Spiritual Activity
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Nucero, Margaret, MSN, NPC
P.I. Institution Name:St. Francis Medical Center
Title:Director of Nursing Research
Abstract The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between nurses' beliefs about their ability to provide spiritual care for their patients and their report of spiritually-related nursing care. The sample for this study was 95 staff nurses and case managers. Two hundred nurses were invited to participate in the study by posting announcements on nursing units and in the dining areas of the medical center. Volunteer participants were given two scales (questionnaires) that measured perceptions of spiritual care and spiritually-related nursing care, respectively, and a demographic questionnaire. The data collection instruments that were used in this study were the Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale (McSherry, Draper, &Kendrick, 2002 the Spiritual Activity Scale, an original scale (internal consistency of .77). Nurses who agreed to participate in the study were given a cover letter that explained the purpose of the study and that participation was completely voluntary. Participants were de-identified by the use of codes. All completed data collection instruments were submitted in a sealed envelope without any personal names on any instruments, to the Director of Nursing Research. Most of the participants were female (n=91). Forty percent were over 40 years of age. Nursing experience ranged from less than one year to 43 years. Fifty four of the nurses identified themselves as Catholic. Twenty five percent of the participants graduated from a Catholic nursing school, and 25% graduated from a non-denominational nursing program. The hypothesis was tested by using a Pearson correlation. Results indicated that beliefs about spiritual care and actual spiritual nursing activity were not related. Nurses with less experience reported more spiritual nursing activity than more experienced nurses (Rho= -.20, p=.03).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Perceptions of Spiritual Care and Nurses' Spiritual Activityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147371-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses' Perceptions of Spiritual Care and Nurses' Spiritual Activity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nucero, Margaret, MSN, NPC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Francis Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Nursing Research</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nppeg@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Abstract The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between nurses' beliefs about their ability to provide spiritual care for their patients and their report of spiritually-related nursing care. The sample for this study was 95 staff nurses and case managers. Two hundred nurses were invited to participate in the study by posting announcements on nursing units and in the dining areas of the medical center. Volunteer participants were given two scales (questionnaires) that measured perceptions of spiritual care and spiritually-related nursing care, respectively, and a demographic questionnaire. The data collection instruments that were used in this study were the Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale (McSherry, Draper, &amp;Kendrick, 2002 the Spiritual Activity Scale, an original scale (internal consistency of .77). Nurses who agreed to participate in the study were given a cover letter that explained the purpose of the study and that participation was completely voluntary. Participants were de-identified by the use of codes. All completed data collection instruments were submitted in a sealed envelope without any personal names on any instruments, to the Director of Nursing Research. Most of the participants were female (n=91). Forty percent were over 40 years of age. Nursing experience ranged from less than one year to 43 years. Fifty four of the nurses identified themselves as Catholic. Twenty five percent of the participants graduated from a Catholic nursing school, and 25% graduated from a non-denominational nursing program. The hypothesis was tested by using a Pearson correlation. Results indicated that beliefs about spiritual care and actual spiritual nursing activity were not related. Nurses with less experience reported more spiritual nursing activity than more experienced nurses (Rho= -.20, p=.03).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:31:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:31:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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