2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147373
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Orphanhood and Loss: Childrens' Perspectives from Botswana
Abstract:
Orphanhood and Loss: Childrens' Perspectives from Botswana
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Phaladze, Nthabiseng A., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Botswana
Title:Dr.
Co-Authors:B. N. Ngwenya, PhD, MSW
Background Little is known about the extent of, or changes in the actual household responsibilities and maintenance as a result of death of primary providers, regardless of the cause. Furthermore, much less is known about the consequences of these changes on orphan children. This paper is based on the results of a national study on Orphan care service delivery. This paper seeks to examine children's experiences of loss and its impact on their quality of life. Methodology A cross-sectional design was utilized for data collection from a sample of n=692. A stratified probability sampling technique was used to select participants. The design was employed to provide comparative data analysis between urban and rural areas. Face-to-Face interviews were conducted with orphan children age ten (10) years and above. Results The results indicate that orphan children have unanswered questions about the death of their parent/parents but are afraid to ask. A number of orphans did not know they were orphans even though they were registered with the Orphan Care program. Most orphaned children reported emotional and psychological pain but do not know where to go to for counseling and/or any other support. Orphan children reported that they felt uncomfortable talking to kin caregivers about their feelings. The findings of this study have implications for psycho-social services in general but in particular health and educational services. Conclusion: A comprehensive orphan care program that includes material, psychological and emotional support is essential for effective coping and general well-being orphans.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOrphanhood and Loss: Childrens' Perspectives from Botswanaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147373-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Orphanhood and Loss: Childrens' Perspectives from Botswana</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Phaladze, Nthabiseng A., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Botswana</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dr.</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">phaladze@mopipi.ub.bw</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B. N. Ngwenya, PhD, MSW</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background Little is known about the extent of, or changes in the actual household responsibilities and maintenance as a result of death of primary providers, regardless of the cause. Furthermore, much less is known about the consequences of these changes on orphan children. This paper is based on the results of a national study on Orphan care service delivery. This paper seeks to examine children's experiences of loss and its impact on their quality of life. Methodology A cross-sectional design was utilized for data collection from a sample of n=692. A stratified probability sampling technique was used to select participants. The design was employed to provide comparative data analysis between urban and rural areas. Face-to-Face interviews were conducted with orphan children age ten (10) years and above. Results The results indicate that orphan children have unanswered questions about the death of their parent/parents but are afraid to ask. A number of orphans did not know they were orphans even though they were registered with the Orphan Care program. Most orphaned children reported emotional and psychological pain but do not know where to go to for counseling and/or any other support. Orphan children reported that they felt uncomfortable talking to kin caregivers about their feelings. The findings of this study have implications for psycho-social services in general but in particular health and educational services. Conclusion: A comprehensive orphan care program that includes material, psychological and emotional support is essential for effective coping and general well-being orphans.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:31:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:31:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.