Using Stories to Bridge Cultural Disparities One Sub-Culture at a Time

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147376
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Stories to Bridge Cultural Disparities One Sub-Culture at a Time
Abstract:
Using Stories to Bridge Cultural Disparities One Sub-Culture at a Time
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Millender, Eugenia I., BSN, MS
P.I. Institution Name:Florida Atlantic University
Title:PhD student
[Invited Poster or Paper Session] PurposeGuatemala-Mayan immigrants in the US are frequently labeled as ?other Hispanic?, expressing cultural insensitivity which contributes to disparities in their health care.  This project seeks to discover the health challenges of stress for these immigrants, as well as how this may relate to substance abuse, in an effort to advance nursing knowledge and begin bridging cultural disparities, one sub-culture at a time. SignificanceCultural diversity in our communities is increasing dramatically.  Nursing knowledge and practice have lagged behind this escalating pace, widening the gap of cultural disparities in health care. Guatemalans almost always are categorized as ?other Hispanics.? The label is accompanied by assumptions that contribute to the health disparity gap. Nurses are uniquely positioned to obtain stories from individuals in their care, and stories can help identify diversity in subcultures, promising potential for bridging disparities.  MethodStory path, a qualitative methodology and theory-guided approach, was used to collect descriptions of stress experiences from Guatemala-Mayan immigrants living in the US. The 30- to 40-minute stories included why participants decided to immigrate, daily stressors, and future hopes and dreams. This pilot study assessed the feasibility of using story path with a Guatemala-Mayan population. FindingsThree participants shared their stories. They equated stress with ?thinking a lot.?  Four themes emerged from their descriptions: leaving family behind, succeeding through finding work, cultural difference, and struggling with resolution.  Substance abuse was identified as an approach participants used to manage stress. Story path was a culturally appropriate approach shown to be feasible for use in this population.   DiscussionStory path was a bridge enabling culturally respectful research to identify health challenges in Guatemala-Mayans. Honoring stories of sub-cultures assists in narrowing health disparity gaps.  Nurse researchers wishing to study health issues in sub-culture groups could consider story path methodology as a culturally sensitive data-gathering approach.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Stories to Bridge Cultural Disparities One Sub-Culture at a Timeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147376-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using Stories to Bridge Cultural Disparities One Sub-Culture at a Time</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Millender, Eugenia I., BSN, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Florida Atlantic University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">emillend@fau.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Invited Poster or Paper Session] PurposeGuatemala-Mayan immigrants in the US are frequently labeled as ?other Hispanic?, expressing cultural insensitivity which contributes to disparities in their health care.&nbsp; This project seeks to discover the health challenges of stress for these immigrants, as well as how this may relate to substance abuse, in an effort to advance nursing knowledge and begin bridging cultural disparities, one sub-culture at a time. SignificanceCultural diversity in our communities is increasing dramatically.&nbsp; Nursing knowledge and practice have lagged behind this escalating pace, widening the gap of cultural disparities in health care. Guatemalans almost always are categorized as ?other Hispanics.? The label is accompanied by assumptions that contribute to the health disparity gap. Nurses are uniquely positioned to obtain stories from individuals in their care, and stories can help identify diversity in subcultures, promising potential for bridging disparities.&nbsp; MethodStory path, a qualitative methodology and theory-guided approach, was used to collect descriptions of stress experiences from Guatemala-Mayan immigrants living in the US. The 30- to 40-minute stories included why participants decided to immigrate, daily stressors, and future hopes and dreams. This pilot study assessed the feasibility of using story path with a Guatemala-Mayan population. FindingsThree participants shared their stories. They equated stress with ?thinking a lot.?&nbsp; Four themes emerged from their descriptions: leaving family behind, succeeding through finding work, cultural difference, and struggling with resolution.&nbsp; Substance abuse was identified as an approach participants used to manage stress. Story path was a culturally appropriate approach shown to be feasible for use in this population. &nbsp; DiscussionStory path was a bridge enabling culturally respectful research to identify health challenges in Guatemala-Mayans. Honoring stories of sub-cultures assists in narrowing health disparity gaps.&nbsp; Nurse researchers wishing to study health issues in sub-culture groups could consider story path methodology as a culturally sensitive data-gathering approach.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:31:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:31:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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