The Effects of Maternal Reflective Functioning on Child Behavior

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147383
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Maternal Reflective Functioning on Child Behavior
Abstract:
The Effects of Maternal Reflective Functioning on Child Behavior
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Ordway, Monica Roosa, PhD-C, APRN, IBCLC
P.I. Institution Name:Yale University
Title:PhD Candidate
Co-Authors:Lois Sadler, PhD, APRN, BC, PNP; Arietta Slade, PhD; Linda Mayes, MD
[Invited Poster or Paper Session] Purpose: The proposed study will consist of a prospective longitudinal design. Participants will be mothers and their infants who participated in a randomized clinical trial of a home visiting intervention. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the intermediate term (1-3 years after trial) effects of the intervention on the relationship between mothers? reflective functioning (RF) and child behavior and adaptation. There is a gap in the literature regarding how parental attributes are translated to the child. One possible mechanism of translation may be RF. This study proposes to evaluate the relationship among RF, parenting, and child behavior outcomes. Theoretical Framework: Transition to parenting, attachment theory, and reflective functioning.Methods: This proposed study includes previously collected data from the primary study as well as follow-up data to be collected 1-3 years after subjects complete the primary study. Assuming data collection will take one year and begin in June 2009, there will be 60 eligible dyads (mothers and children age 3-5 years old) for the proposed study.  The setting of the study includes a federally funded community-based health center (CHC) located in  New Haven, CT. Measures include Maternal Self-Report Inventory, maternal Sense of Mastery, CES-D, Strange Situation Procedure, and Child Behavior Checklist/1.5-5, and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Survey. Data analyses will include univariate analyses as well as repeated measures (ANOVA or mixed model) and linear regression.Results: Data collection to begin June 2009. Results to be reported January 2011.Conclusions and Implications: Multiple studies have shown a relationship between early parenting and child behavior. This study may potentially demonstrate the intermediate effects of a preventive program to enhance parental reflective functioning and  the parent-child relationship and thereby help to diminish child behavior problems among at-risk families.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Maternal Reflective Functioning on Child Behavioren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147383-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Maternal Reflective Functioning on Child Behavior</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ordway, Monica Roosa, PhD-C, APRN, IBCLC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Yale University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">monica.ordway@yale.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lois Sadler, PhD, APRN, BC, PNP; Arietta Slade, PhD; Linda Mayes, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Invited Poster or Paper Session] Purpose: The proposed study will consist of a prospective longitudinal design. Participants will be mothers and their infants who participated in a randomized clinical trial of a home visiting intervention. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the intermediate term (1-3 years after trial) effects of the intervention on the relationship between mothers? reflective functioning (RF) and child behavior and adaptation. There is a gap in the literature regarding how parental attributes are translated to the child. One possible mechanism of translation may be RF. This study proposes to evaluate the relationship among RF, parenting, and child behavior outcomes. Theoretical Framework: Transition to parenting, attachment theory, and reflective functioning.Methods: This proposed study includes previously collected data from the primary study as well as follow-up data to be collected 1-3 years after subjects complete the primary study. Assuming data collection will take one year and begin in June 2009, there will be 60 eligible dyads (mothers and children age 3-5 years old) for the proposed study.&nbsp; The setting of the study includes a federally funded community-based health center (CHC) located in&nbsp; New Haven, CT. Measures include Maternal Self-Report Inventory, maternal Sense of Mastery, CES-D, Strange Situation Procedure, and Child Behavior Checklist/1.5-5, and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Survey. Data analyses will include univariate analyses as well as repeated measures (ANOVA or mixed model) and linear regression.Results: Data collection to begin June 2009. Results to be reported January 2011.Conclusions and Implications: Multiple studies have shown a relationship between early parenting and child behavior. This study may potentially demonstrate the intermediate effects of a preventive program to enhance parental reflective functioning and&nbsp; the parent-child relationship and thereby help to diminish child behavior problems among at-risk families.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:31:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:31:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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