An Analysis of Conjoint Roles in Hospitals: Clinical Forensic Nursing Services in Quality Management Review of Suspicious Patient Death and Management of Evidence in Real Time

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147395
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Analysis of Conjoint Roles in Hospitals: Clinical Forensic Nursing Services in Quality Management Review of Suspicious Patient Death and Management of Evidence in Real Time
Abstract:
An Analysis of Conjoint Roles in Hospitals: Clinical Forensic Nursing Services in Quality Management Review of Suspicious Patient Death and Management of Evidence in Real Time
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Rix, Kathleen, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Northampton VA Medical Center
Title:Evening Clinical Coordinator
Co-Authors:Mary Sullivan, MSN, RN-BC, CARN, FAAFS
[Leadership Session Presentation] As was evident in the Gilbert case and in the majority of serial murder by healthcare provider cases, alarming trends of patient death came to the attention of the Quality Management department after the fact. Suspicions were reported up the supervisory chain and then data was analyzed to determine if it supported the allegations before any further action was taken.It is crucial that not only do QM staff recognize suspicious trends promptly, but that real time data be available to review on a regular basis rather than information collected on random patients, day or weeks after an event. Yorker, et al 2006, reports that less than routine quality management activities are one reason there was an increase in the likelihood that these crimes were undetected for so long. The clinical forensic nurse is in a prime position to fulfill the responsibility of responding to all patient death, collecting pertinent data and managing medical evidence. If the death is not suspicious, all information may be archived and retrieved later should events lead to re-examining the information at a later time (Sullivan 2009). What constitutes medical evidence will be discussed as well as other contributors to caregiver malfeasance. References: Yorker,B., Kizer, K., Lampe, P., Forrest, A.R.W., Lannan, J., Russell, D., (2006) Serial Murder By Healthcare Professionals, Journal of Forensic Science, 51(6), pg1362-1371. Sullivan, M.K., (2009) Serial Murder in Healthcare Settings: Clinical and Forensic Implications, Journal of Nursing Management (Accepted and pending publication 2009).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Analysis of Conjoint Roles in Hospitals: Clinical Forensic Nursing Services in Quality Management Review of Suspicious Patient Death and Management of Evidence in Real Timeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147395-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Analysis of Conjoint Roles in Hospitals: Clinical Forensic Nursing Services in Quality Management Review of Suspicious Patient Death and Management of Evidence in Real Time</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rix, Kathleen, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northampton VA Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Evening Clinical Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kathyrix@comcast.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Sullivan, MSN, RN-BC, CARN, FAAFS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Leadership Session Presentation] As was evident in the Gilbert case and in the majority of serial murder by healthcare provider cases, alarming trends of patient death came to the attention of the Quality Management department after the fact. Suspicions were reported up the supervisory chain and then data was analyzed to determine if it supported the allegations before any further action was taken.It is crucial that not only do QM staff recognize suspicious trends promptly, but that real time data be available to review on a regular basis rather than information collected on random patients, day or weeks after an event. Yorker, et al 2006, reports that less than routine quality management activities are one reason there was an increase in the likelihood that these crimes were undetected for so long. The clinical forensic nurse is in a prime position to fulfill the responsibility of responding to all patient death, collecting pertinent data and managing medical evidence. If the death is not suspicious, all information may be archived and retrieved later should events lead to re-examining the information at a later time (Sullivan 2009). What constitutes medical evidence will be discussed as well as other contributors to caregiver malfeasance. References: Yorker,B., Kizer, K., Lampe, P., Forrest, A.R.W., Lannan, J., Russell, D., (2006) Serial Murder By Healthcare Professionals, Journal of Forensic Science, 51(6), pg1362-1371. Sullivan, M.K., (2009) Serial Murder in Healthcare Settings: Clinical and Forensic Implications, Journal of Nursing Management (Accepted and pending publication 2009).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:31:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:31:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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