Autonomy and Self-Efficacy as Predictors of Nurses' Behavioral Intention to Disinfect Needleless Intravenous Systems

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147403
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Autonomy and Self-Efficacy as Predictors of Nurses' Behavioral Intention to Disinfect Needleless Intravenous Systems
Abstract:
Autonomy and Self-Efficacy as Predictors of Nurses' Behavioral Intention to Disinfect Needleless Intravenous Systems
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Smith, Judy, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Family of Hospitals
Title:Senior PICC RN
Co-Authors:Kenn M. Kirksey, RN, PhD, ACNS-BC; Heather Becker, PhD; Eduardo C. Chavez, BS, BSN, RN; Nancy Mastronardi, BSN, RN
[Scientific Session Presentation] Purpose: Effective disinfection of needleless access devices is paramount. Studies demonstrate optimal disinfection time is 15 seconds. Despite scientific support for this ?gold standard,? there remains a paucity of reported literature regarding why nurses do not consistently adhere to this guideline. Therefore, the study purpose was to examine predictors (autonomy, self-efficacy, and beliefs) of behavioral intention to utilize best practice disinfection techniques in needleless intravenous systems. Methods: Descriptive, correlational design; Convenience sample (N=171); Scales: Dempster Practice Behaviors and General Self Efficacy (with well established validity/reliability). A third instrument, Smith/Becker Attitudes Toward Disinfection Techniques, was investigator-designed and based upon Fishbein and Ajzen?s Theories of Planned Behavior and Reasoned Action. This scale measures beliefs, values, control, social norm and motive to comply with disinfection of needleless connectors. The outcome measure was behavioral intention to disinfect needleless access devices. Conclusions: Mean age: 35.17 years (SD 11.48; 21-71 years); the majority of participants were white, non-Hispanic (71.3%, n=122), and female (81.9%; n=140). Seventy-one percent (n=122) had a BSN or higher degree and were registered nurses an average of 9.03 (SD=11.32) years. Years of experience correlated with autonomy (r=0.31; p=0.00) and self-efficacy (r=0.24; p=0.002). Negative correlations were found on age (r=-0.17; p=0.03) and years of practice experience (r=-0.23; p=0.003) with behavioral intention to consistently use optimal disinfection techniques. There was a positive correlation between concern for preventing introduction of bacteria into the bloodstream and behavioral intention (r=0.26; p=0.001).  Beliefs (social norms) of colleagues (unit leaders, physicians, PICC nurses) were significantly correlated with behavioral intention, but perceptions of staff nurses? attitudes most influenced decisions to scrub the hub (r=0.45; p=0.00). Implications: While older, more experienced nurses were more autonomous and self-efficacious, they were less likely to utilize established best practice in disinfecting needleless intravenous systems. The findings have important implications for nursing education and preceptor training.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAutonomy and Self-Efficacy as Predictors of Nurses' Behavioral Intention to Disinfect Needleless Intravenous Systemsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147403-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Autonomy and Self-Efficacy as Predictors of Nurses' Behavioral Intention to Disinfect Needleless Intravenous Systems</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith, Judy, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Family of Hospitals</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Senior PICC RN</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jssmith@seton.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kenn M. Kirksey, RN, PhD, ACNS-BC; Heather Becker, PhD; Eduardo C. Chavez, BS, BSN, RN; Nancy Mastronardi, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] Purpose: Effective disinfection of needleless access devices is paramount. Studies demonstrate optimal disinfection time is 15 seconds. Despite scientific support for this ?gold standard,? there remains a paucity of reported literature regarding why nurses do not consistently adhere to this guideline. Therefore, the study purpose was to examine predictors (autonomy, self-efficacy, and beliefs) of behavioral intention to utilize best practice disinfection techniques in needleless intravenous systems. Methods: Descriptive, correlational design; Convenience sample (N=171); Scales: Dempster Practice Behaviors and General Self Efficacy (with well established validity/reliability). A third instrument, Smith/Becker Attitudes Toward Disinfection Techniques, was investigator-designed and based upon Fishbein and Ajzen?s Theories of Planned Behavior and Reasoned Action. This scale measures beliefs, values, control, social norm and motive to comply with disinfection of needleless connectors. The outcome measure was behavioral intention to disinfect needleless access devices. Conclusions: Mean age: 35.17 years (SD 11.48; 21-71 years); the majority of participants were white, non-Hispanic (71.3%, n=122), and female (81.9%; n=140). Seventy-one percent (n=122) had a BSN or higher degree and were registered nurses an average of 9.03 (SD=11.32) years. Years of experience correlated with autonomy (r=0.31; p=0.00) and self-efficacy (r=0.24; p=0.002). Negative correlations were found on age (r=-0.17; p=0.03) and years of practice experience (r=-0.23; p=0.003) with behavioral intention to consistently use optimal disinfection techniques. There was a positive correlation between concern for preventing introduction of bacteria into the bloodstream and behavioral intention (r=0.26; p=0.001). &nbsp;Beliefs (social norms) of colleagues (unit leaders, physicians, PICC nurses) were significantly correlated with behavioral intention, but perceptions of staff nurses? attitudes most influenced decisions to scrub the hub (r=0.45; p=0.00). Implications: While older, more experienced nurses were more autonomous and self-efficacious, they were less likely to utilize established best practice in disinfecting needleless intravenous systems. The findings have important implications for nursing education and preceptor training.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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