Critical Thinking and Beyond: Using Care Scene Investigation (CSI) to Develop Habits of the Mind

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147417
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Critical Thinking and Beyond: Using Care Scene Investigation (CSI) to Develop Habits of the Mind
Abstract:
Critical Thinking and Beyond: Using Care Scene Investigation (CSI) to Develop Habits of the Mind
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Webb, Jill J., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Union University
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Tracy Lytle Saddler, DNP, APN, ACNP-BC, CEN, CCRN; Kathy O'Connor, MSN, APN, FNP-BC
[Clinical Session Presentation] The Institute of Medicine (IOM) and Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) call for safety and demand vigilance for all clinicians. In order to provide safe patient care, the novice nurse must accurately ?notice? the patient and environment, recognize data that does not fit, and develop a system for reconciling data. The expert nurse has developed the ability to synthesize data instinctively based on clinical reasoning, pattern recognition and confidence. These are ?habits of the mind,? or the ability to critically think; a vague concept to the novice nurse. Critical thinking is a disciplined intellectual process requiring skillful clinical reasoning enabling the nurse to systematically and logically synthesize information, make decisions, and confidently implement decisions in the clinical environment. To think critically, the novice nurse must first form ?habits of the mind.?  Critical thinking alone cannot achieve optimal patient safety, there must also be conscientious evidence appraisal and data reconciliation. Critical thinking and accurate surveillance of both the patient and the environment lead to patient safety, risk reduction and optimal patient outcomes. Increasing patient acuity and complexity of clinical facilities leads to medical errors and breaches in patient safety; therefore undergraduate nursing faculty must prepare students to develop habits of the mind allowing the students to catch inconsistency and error.  Undergraduate nursing faculty challenge students to critically think, but students must understand how and what it means to achieve this goal. As a result of this call to higher standards of patient safety and the desire to instill in students the ability to critically think, faculty at Union University developed a model to enculturate students to accurately survey the patient and environment, as well as develop habits of the mind, thereby providing for risk reduction and patient safety. This model is known as CSI to DOOR, a mnemonic for Care Scene Investigation (CSI) to Data Reconciliation, Organization of Care, and Ordering of System Resources (DOOR). The purpose of this presentation is to introduce nursing educators to a simple tool used to promote critical thinking in undergraduate nursing students.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCritical Thinking and Beyond: Using Care Scene Investigation (CSI) to Develop Habits of the Minden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147417-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Critical Thinking and Beyond: Using Care Scene Investigation (CSI) to Develop Habits of the Mind</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Webb, Jill J., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Union University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jwebb@uu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Tracy Lytle Saddler, DNP, APN, ACNP-BC, CEN, CCRN; Kathy O'Connor, MSN, APN, FNP-BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical Session Presentation] The Institute of Medicine (IOM) and Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) call for safety and demand vigilance for all clinicians. In order to provide safe patient care, the novice nurse must accurately ?notice? the patient and environment, recognize data that does not fit, and develop a system for reconciling data. The expert nurse has developed the ability to synthesize data instinctively based on clinical reasoning, pattern recognition and confidence. These are ?habits of the mind,? or the ability to critically think; a vague concept to the novice nurse. Critical thinking is a disciplined intellectual process requiring skillful clinical reasoning enabling the nurse to systematically and logically synthesize information, make decisions, and confidently implement decisions in the clinical environment. To think critically, the novice nurse must first form ?habits of the mind.? &nbsp;Critical thinking alone cannot achieve optimal patient safety, there must also be conscientious evidence appraisal and data reconciliation. Critical thinking and accurate surveillance of both the patient and the environment lead to patient safety, risk reduction and optimal patient outcomes. Increasing patient acuity and complexity of clinical facilities leads to medical errors and breaches in patient safety; therefore undergraduate nursing faculty must prepare students to develop habits of the mind allowing the students to catch inconsistency and error. &nbsp;Undergraduate nursing faculty challenge students to critically think, but students must understand how and what it means to achieve this goal. As a result of this call to higher standards of patient safety and the desire to instill in students the ability to critically think, faculty at Union University developed a model to enculturate students to accurately survey the patient and environment, as well as develop habits of the mind, thereby providing for risk reduction and patient safety. This model is known as CSI to DOOR, a mnemonic for Care Scene Investigation (CSI) to Data Reconciliation, Organization of Care, and Ordering of System Resources (DOOR). The purpose of this presentation is to introduce nursing educators to a simple tool used to promote critical thinking in undergraduate nursing students.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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