The Efficiency of Two Warming Methods for Postoperative Hypothermia: A Randomized Controlled Trial for Patients After Spinal Surgery at Recovery Room

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147426
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Efficiency of Two Warming Methods for Postoperative Hypothermia: A Randomized Controlled Trial for Patients After Spinal Surgery at Recovery Room
Abstract:
The Efficiency of Two Warming Methods for Postoperative Hypothermia: A Randomized Controlled Trial for Patients After Spinal Surgery at Recovery Room
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Yang, Hsiu-Ling, BS
P.I. Institution Name:Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou Branch
Title:RN
Co-Authors:Yu-Yun Su, BS; Hsiu-Fang Lee, MS; Mei-Chen Liao, MS; Jun-Yu Fan, PhD
[Scientific Session Presentation] BACKGROUND: Postoperative hypothermia is commonly encountered in the post-anesthesic patients. Effective warming devices may accelerate rewarming process, suppresses shivering thermogenesis, improve patient comfort, and decrease adverse events for patients with cardiovascular disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of two warming methods, warmed cotton blankets versus radiant heaters, for postoperative hypothermic patients after spinal surgery at recovery room.  METHODS: A randomized controlled trial was performed at a medial referral center in Taiwan. Of the 130 patients undergoing spinal surgery, 65 patients received warmed cotton blankets and the other 65 received radiant heaters. Tympanic temperature was measured every 10 minutes until reaching 36 degree Celsius (°C) (96.8 Fahrenheit) and the time needed for rewarming to 36 °C was recorded. Independent-samples t test was used to examine the time usage for rewarming to 36°C and the survival analysis was used to compare which of the warming methods was more efficient.  RESULTS: The patients? demographics between study groups were the same in terms of age, gender, amount of blood loss, length of operation, tympanic temperature prior to initiating operation and arrival at recovery room. In terms of the time needed for rewarming to 36 °C, the radiant heater group showed statistically significant shorter than those with warmed cotton blankets (43.5 vs. 76.8 min, p=0.022). The results also showed that the radiant heater group has a more efficient temperature rising than those with warmed cotton blankets (log rank test, p=0.000).  CONCLUSIONS: Our results prove that radiant heater is a more effective method than warmed cotton blanket with regard to rewarming postoperative hypothermic patients after spinal surgery at recovery room.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Efficiency of Two Warming Methods for Postoperative Hypothermia: A Randomized Controlled Trial for Patients After Spinal Surgery at Recovery Roomen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147426-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Efficiency of Two Warming Methods for Postoperative Hypothermia: A Randomized Controlled Trial for Patients After Spinal Surgery at Recovery Room</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yang, Hsiu-Ling, BS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou Branch</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">RN</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chiu.amy@msa.hinet.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Yu-Yun Su, BS; Hsiu-Fang Lee, MS; Mei-Chen Liao, MS; Jun-Yu Fan, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] BACKGROUND: Postoperative hypothermia is commonly encountered in the post-anesthesic patients. Effective warming devices may accelerate rewarming process, suppresses shivering thermogenesis, improve patient comfort, and decrease adverse events for patients with cardiovascular disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of two warming methods, warmed cotton blankets versus radiant heaters, for postoperative hypothermic patients after spinal surgery at recovery room.&nbsp; METHODS: A randomized controlled trial was performed at a medial referral center in Taiwan. Of the 130 patients undergoing spinal surgery, 65 patients received warmed cotton blankets and the other 65 received radiant heaters. Tympanic temperature was measured every 10 minutes until reaching 36 degree Celsius (&deg;C) (96.8 Fahrenheit) and the time needed for rewarming to 36 &deg;C was recorded. Independent-samples t test was used to examine the time usage for rewarming to 36&deg;C and the survival analysis was used to compare which of the warming methods was more efficient.&nbsp; RESULTS: The patients? demographics between study groups were the same in terms of age, gender, amount of blood loss, length of operation, tympanic temperature prior to initiating operation and arrival at recovery room. In terms of the time needed for rewarming to 36 &deg;C, the radiant heater group showed statistically significant shorter than those with warmed cotton blankets (43.5 vs. 76.8 min, p=0.022). The results also showed that the radiant heater group has a more efficient temperature rising than those with warmed cotton blankets (log rank test, p=0.000).&nbsp; CONCLUSIONS: Our results prove that radiant heater is a more effective method than warmed cotton blanket with regard to rewarming postoperative hypothermic patients after spinal surgery at recovery room.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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