The Relationship Among RNs' Personality Type, Weight Status, Weight Loss Motivating Factors, Weight Loss Regimens, and Successful or Unsuccessful Weight Loss

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147429
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship Among RNs' Personality Type, Weight Status, Weight Loss Motivating Factors, Weight Loss Regimens, and Successful or Unsuccessful Weight Loss
Abstract:
The Relationship Among RNs' Personality Type, Weight Status, Weight Loss Motivating Factors, Weight Loss Regimens, and Successful or Unsuccessful Weight Loss
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Zitkus, Bruce S., EdD, RN, MS, BS, BA
P.I. Institution Name:Stony Brook University School of Nursing
Title:Clinical Associate Professor
[Scientific Session Presentation] The purpose of the study was to investigate whether there was a relationship between weight loss regimens used by RNs and their successful or unsuccessful weight loss attempts.  Relationships among personality type, motivation level, weight loss regimens (diet, exercise, social interaction and pharmacotherapy) and demographic data (age, gender, BMI, ethnicity, education level, disability status, shift work hours and prescription medication use) were studied.  A demographic survey and the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Form M were used to gather pertinent data.  Seven hundred and twenty one RNs participated in this quantitative study.  No significant associations were found between a RN?s personality type and Body Mass Index, however it was noted that 57 percent of the participants were either overweight (30 percent) or obese (27 percent) while 42 percent of the RNs were found to be of normal weight.  It was also noted that all 16 MBTI personality types were found among the RNs in this study.  Introverted Intuitive Thinking Perceiving and Extraverted Sensing Feeling Perceiving types were more likely to be within the normal weight category.  Whereas, those reporting as Introverted Intuitive Feeling Perceiving or Introverted Sensing Thinking Perceiving types were more likely to be found in the overweight and obese categories respectively.  No other significant relationships were found among the other 12 MBTI personality types and weight status.  The study revealed that RNs were more successful in their weight loss attempts if they did not use a specific diet regimen, had an initial lower BMI (overweight vs obese), and exercised.  RNs were less successful in their weight loss attempts if they used prescription medications that caused weight gain.  Additionally, those RNs who had a physical disability had a higher BMI than those who did not and younger RNs were more motivated to lose weight than older RNs. It is suggested that adherence to behavioral change in dietary intake may be more effective in weight loss attempts than any specific diet.  In addition, individuals who take prescription medications should ask their health care provider if any changes could be made to these medications.  Lastly, exercise should be used by all attempting weight loss.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship Among RNs' Personality Type, Weight Status, Weight Loss Motivating Factors, Weight Loss Regimens, and Successful or Unsuccessful Weight Lossen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147429-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship Among RNs' Personality Type, Weight Status, Weight Loss Motivating Factors, Weight Loss Regimens, and Successful or Unsuccessful Weight Loss</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zitkus, Bruce S., EdD, RN, MS, BS, BA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Stony Brook University School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bruce.zitkus@stonybrook.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] The purpose of the study was to investigate whether there was a relationship between weight loss regimens used by RNs and their successful or unsuccessful weight loss attempts.&nbsp; Relationships among personality type, motivation level, weight loss regimens (diet, exercise, social interaction and pharmacotherapy) and demographic data (age, gender, BMI, ethnicity, education level, disability status, shift work hours and prescription medication use) were studied.&nbsp; A demographic survey and the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Form M were used to gather pertinent data.&nbsp; Seven hundred and twenty one RNs participated in this quantitative study.&nbsp; No significant associations were found between a RN?s personality type and Body Mass Index, however it was noted that 57 percent of the participants were either overweight (30 percent) or obese (27 percent) while 42 percent of the RNs were found to be of normal weight.&nbsp; It was also noted that all 16 MBTI personality types were found among the RNs in this study.&nbsp; Introverted Intuitive Thinking Perceiving and Extraverted Sensing Feeling Perceiving types were more likely to be within the normal weight category.&nbsp; Whereas, those reporting as Introverted Intuitive Feeling Perceiving or Introverted Sensing Thinking Perceiving types were more likely to be found in the overweight and obese categories respectively.&nbsp; No other significant relationships were found among the other 12 MBTI personality types and weight status.&nbsp; The study revealed that RNs were more successful in their weight loss attempts if they did not use a specific diet regimen, had an initial lower BMI (overweight vs obese), and exercised.&nbsp; RNs were less successful in their weight loss attempts if they used prescription medications that caused weight gain.&nbsp; Additionally, those RNs who had a physical disability had a higher BMI than those who did not and younger RNs were more motivated to lose weight than older RNs. It is suggested that adherence to behavioral change in dietary intake may be more effective in weight loss attempts than any specific diet.&nbsp; In addition, individuals who take prescription medications should ask their health care provider if any changes could be made to these medications.&nbsp; Lastly, exercise should be used by all attempting weight loss.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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