Infant Health Status: Correlates with Maternal Stress and Close Relationships

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147432
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Infant Health Status: Correlates with Maternal Stress and Close Relationships
Abstract:
Infant Health Status: Correlates with Maternal Stress and Close Relationships
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Coffman, Sherrilyn, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Sierra Health Services
Title:Nurse Practitioner
The association between infant illness and maternal stress and close relationships is the focus of this longitudinal study. Mothers of 83 neonatal intensive care (NICU) and normal nursery infants were studied at 5 weeks after childbirth, and 43 of these women were followed up at 13 months. Lazarus's model of psychological stress was utilized in studying maternal perceptions. Utilizing different measures of stress at varying periods after birth, other studies have found that mothers of NICU infants may be more, less, or equally distressed as mothers of healthy infants. Little is known about the effect of illness during the infant's first year on stress and close relationships in mothers.



The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore the relationships between infant health status from birth to 13 months of age and maternal stress and close relationships. It was hypothesized that mothers of sick infants would perceive greater stress and less closeness and support in their relationships at 5 weeks and 13 months after childbirth. Both interviews and questionnaires were used to collect data. The quality of the relationship between the mother and her closest support person (primarily husbands or mothers) was measured by two relationship scales. Support from the close person was measured by the Close Person Support Scale, based on Kahn and Antonucci. Stress was measured by a modified version of the Hassles Scale, developed by Kanner, Coyne, Schaefer, and Lazarus. Infant risk status at birth was determined by hospital nurses, based on specified criteria. At the time of the 5 week data collection, some of the NICU infants remained hospitalized and others were home. Data were also collected from mothers regarding number of major and minor illnesses and hospitalizations experienced by infants during the first 13 months of life.



Data analysis at 5 weeks after birth revealed that mothers of NICU and normal nursery infants did not vary on any of the maternal variables, including close relationship satisfaction, close support, and stress. However, mothers of NICU infants who remained hospitalized at 5 weeks after birth were found to have greater stress. At 13 months after birth, mothers whose infants experienced major illnesses and hospitalizations after the newborn period were found to have less relationship satisfaction and closeness, less close support, more negative change in their close relationship, and greater stress.



The significant relationship between infant illness/hospitalization and maternal/close person variables at both time periods validates the importance of focusing on the whole family in the NICU and pediatric setting.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInfant Health Status: Correlates with Maternal Stress and Close Relationshipsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147432-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Infant Health Status: Correlates with Maternal Stress and Close Relationships</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Coffman, Sherrilyn, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Sierra Health Services</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">scoffman@sierrahealth.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The association between infant illness and maternal stress and close relationships is the focus of this longitudinal study. Mothers of 83 neonatal intensive care (NICU) and normal nursery infants were studied at 5 weeks after childbirth, and 43 of these women were followed up at 13 months. Lazarus's model of psychological stress was utilized in studying maternal perceptions. Utilizing different measures of stress at varying periods after birth, other studies have found that mothers of NICU infants may be more, less, or equally distressed as mothers of healthy infants. Little is known about the effect of illness during the infant's first year on stress and close relationships in mothers.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore the relationships between infant health status from birth to 13 months of age and maternal stress and close relationships. It was hypothesized that mothers of sick infants would perceive greater stress and less closeness and support in their relationships at 5 weeks and 13 months after childbirth. Both interviews and questionnaires were used to collect data. The quality of the relationship between the mother and her closest support person (primarily husbands or mothers) was measured by two relationship scales. Support from the close person was measured by the Close Person Support Scale, based on Kahn and Antonucci. Stress was measured by a modified version of the Hassles Scale, developed by Kanner, Coyne, Schaefer, and Lazarus. Infant risk status at birth was determined by hospital nurses, based on specified criteria. At the time of the 5 week data collection, some of the NICU infants remained hospitalized and others were home. Data were also collected from mothers regarding number of major and minor illnesses and hospitalizations experienced by infants during the first 13 months of life.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Data analysis at 5 weeks after birth revealed that mothers of NICU and normal nursery infants did not vary on any of the maternal variables, including close relationship satisfaction, close support, and stress. However, mothers of NICU infants who remained hospitalized at 5 weeks after birth were found to have greater stress. At 13 months after birth, mothers whose infants experienced major illnesses and hospitalizations after the newborn period were found to have less relationship satisfaction and closeness, less close support, more negative change in their close relationship, and greater stress.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The significant relationship between infant illness/hospitalization and maternal/close person variables at both time periods validates the importance of focusing on the whole family in the NICU and pediatric setting.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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