Relationship of menstrual cycle stage with symptoms of infectious illnesses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147436
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship of menstrual cycle stage with symptoms of infectious illnesses
Abstract:
Relationship of menstrual cycle stage with symptoms of infectious illnesses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Droppleman, Patricia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Tennessee, College of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Many women, while not disabled by menstrual cycle related symptoms,

experience some cyclical distress. Such distress may entrain

rhythms in immune function through psychoneuroimmunological (PNI)

mechanisms. The fact that women have anecdotally related an

increase in infection susceptibility during the premenstrual and

menstrual cycle phases, has largely been ignored by menstrual cycle

and immunology researchers. Women have been excluded from many

immunologic studies, often due to fears that cyclic variations

might confound results. A few studies support cyclical

variations in monocyte phagocytosis, natural killer cell

cytotoxicity, and T helper/T suppressor cell ratios. Animal

studies also support an influence of estrogen and progesterone on

various immune functions.



The study reported here examined the relationships between symptoms

of common infectious illnesses, menstrual cycle phase, and cycle

related menstrual distress. Sixty-five women between the ages of

21 and 40 with regular menstrual cycles, no chronic illness, and no

current use of birth control pills completed the study. Subjects

kept a record of perimenstrual distress symptoms (the Menstrual

Distress Questionnaire) and completed an investigator-developed

symptom check list which inventoried symptoms of common

respiratory, skin, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary infections.

Subjects completed the questionnaires three times during the

menstrual cycle (during menstruation, midcycle, and premenstruum).

Since there was significant skewness and/or kurtosis for several

scales, nonparametric statistical procedures were used. The

frequency of symptoms in the four systems during the three

menstrual cycle phases was analyzed and compared by the McNemar

statistic; Spearman correlation coefficients, the Wilcoxon sign

rank test and the Mann Whitney U-Test were used for comparing

symptoms and menstrual distress and for examining severity of

symptom scores across the cycle.



The results indicated a highly significant clustering of infectious

illness symptoms during the premenstrual and menstrual phases

compared to midcycle. There was a significant relationship between

menstrual cycle related distress and symptoms of infectious

illness. This research has many implications for nursing

interventions with symptomatic women and adds to the current PNI

research which supports links between distress and immune

suppression.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship of menstrual cycle stage with symptoms of infectious illnessesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147436-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship of menstrual cycle stage with symptoms of infectious illnesses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Droppleman, Patricia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Tennessee, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Many women, while not disabled by menstrual cycle related symptoms,<br/><br/>experience some cyclical distress. Such distress may entrain<br/><br/>rhythms in immune function through psychoneuroimmunological (PNI)<br/><br/>mechanisms. The fact that women have anecdotally related an<br/><br/>increase in infection susceptibility during the premenstrual and<br/><br/>menstrual cycle phases, has largely been ignored by menstrual cycle<br/><br/>and immunology researchers. Women have been excluded from many<br/><br/>immunologic studies, often due to fears that cyclic variations<br/><br/>might confound results. A few studies support cyclical<br/><br/>variations in monocyte phagocytosis, natural killer cell<br/><br/>cytotoxicity, and T helper/T suppressor cell ratios. Animal<br/><br/>studies also support an influence of estrogen and progesterone on<br/><br/>various immune functions.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The study reported here examined the relationships between symptoms<br/><br/>of common infectious illnesses, menstrual cycle phase, and cycle<br/><br/>related menstrual distress. Sixty-five women between the ages of<br/><br/>21 and 40 with regular menstrual cycles, no chronic illness, and no<br/><br/>current use of birth control pills completed the study. Subjects<br/><br/>kept a record of perimenstrual distress symptoms (the Menstrual<br/><br/>Distress Questionnaire) and completed an investigator-developed<br/><br/>symptom check list which inventoried symptoms of common<br/><br/>respiratory, skin, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary infections.<br/><br/>Subjects completed the questionnaires three times during the<br/><br/>menstrual cycle (during menstruation, midcycle, and premenstruum).<br/><br/>Since there was significant skewness and/or kurtosis for several<br/><br/>scales, nonparametric statistical procedures were used. The<br/><br/>frequency of symptoms in the four systems during the three<br/><br/>menstrual cycle phases was analyzed and compared by the McNemar<br/><br/>statistic; Spearman correlation coefficients, the Wilcoxon sign<br/><br/>rank test and the Mann Whitney U-Test were used for comparing<br/><br/>symptoms and menstrual distress and for examining severity of<br/><br/>symptom scores across the cycle.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The results indicated a highly significant clustering of infectious<br/><br/>illness symptoms during the premenstrual and menstrual phases<br/><br/>compared to midcycle. There was a significant relationship between<br/><br/>menstrual cycle related distress and symptoms of infectious<br/><br/>illness. This research has many implications for nursing<br/><br/>interventions with symptomatic women and adds to the current PNI<br/><br/>research which supports links between distress and immune<br/><br/>suppression.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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