Decreased infant mortality among low income black women receiving prenatal care from nurses functioning in an expanded role

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147442
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Decreased infant mortality among low income black women receiving prenatal care from nurses functioning in an expanded role
Abstract:
Decreased infant mortality among low income black women receiving prenatal care from nurses functioning in an expanded role
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Clark, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Assistant Professor
Year 2000 Health Objectives for the Nation identified infant

mortality as a major health concern particularly affecting teens,

low income and black women. Inadequate and inaccessible prenatal

care has been cited as factors contributing to the problem. For

the past 10 years, low income women have been offered prenatal care

services at a rural county health clinic in northeast Georgia by

nurses functioning in an expanded role. Utilizing clinic nurses in

this capacity both increased access of low income women to prenatal

care and provided more comprehensive services. The purpose of this

research was to determine whether significant differences in infant

mortality could be observed between black women who received

prenatal care from nurses at the county health department and those

who did not after controlling for known demographic and medical

risk factors.



A retrospective study was conducted of all black women (n = 1396)

who gave birth in a rural county of northeast Georgia from 1980 to

1989 utilizing demographic, medical and social information obtained

from state birth and death tapes. Identification of women who

attended the health department was determined through computerized

matching of health department records with birth tape files.

Charts of women who were health department clients were reviewed to

determine the extent of services received. Chi Square tests of

homogeneity were used to evaluate crude differences in infant

mortality and prenatal risk factors. Multivariate analysis was

performed using logistic regression.



Overall, 53 percent of the black women were enrolled in the health

department prenatal program with the proportion of women receiving

care at the health department increasing from 46 percent in 1980 to

74 percent in 1989. For women under age 18, the proportion

receiving care at the health department increased from a low of 48

percent to 97 percent. In general, the clientele of the health

department had more of the traditional risk factors for infant

death than the others subjects. These included lower levels of

education, younger age, and single marital status. After

controlling for age, education, marital status and twin births,

health department clients were 2.2 times less likely to have an

infant die than were the other subjects. In this study, health

department clients had significantly better prenatal care as

determined by the Kessner Index. Results of this study demonstrate

that prenatal care is associated with decreased infant mortality

and suggests that nurses functioning in an expanded role are

successful in delivering these services.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDecreased infant mortality among low income black women receiving prenatal care from nurses functioning in an expanded roleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147442-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Decreased infant mortality among low income black women receiving prenatal care from nurses functioning in an expanded role</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clark, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Year 2000 Health Objectives for the Nation identified infant<br/><br/>mortality as a major health concern particularly affecting teens,<br/><br/>low income and black women. Inadequate and inaccessible prenatal<br/><br/>care has been cited as factors contributing to the problem. For<br/><br/>the past 10 years, low income women have been offered prenatal care<br/><br/>services at a rural county health clinic in northeast Georgia by<br/><br/>nurses functioning in an expanded role. Utilizing clinic nurses in<br/><br/>this capacity both increased access of low income women to prenatal<br/><br/>care and provided more comprehensive services. The purpose of this<br/><br/>research was to determine whether significant differences in infant<br/><br/>mortality could be observed between black women who received<br/><br/>prenatal care from nurses at the county health department and those<br/><br/>who did not after controlling for known demographic and medical<br/><br/>risk factors.<br/><br/><br/><br/>A retrospective study was conducted of all black women (n = 1396)<br/><br/>who gave birth in a rural county of northeast Georgia from 1980 to<br/><br/>1989 utilizing demographic, medical and social information obtained<br/><br/>from state birth and death tapes. Identification of women who<br/><br/>attended the health department was determined through computerized<br/><br/>matching of health department records with birth tape files.<br/><br/>Charts of women who were health department clients were reviewed to<br/><br/>determine the extent of services received. Chi Square tests of<br/><br/>homogeneity were used to evaluate crude differences in infant<br/><br/>mortality and prenatal risk factors. Multivariate analysis was<br/><br/>performed using logistic regression.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Overall, 53 percent of the black women were enrolled in the health<br/><br/>department prenatal program with the proportion of women receiving<br/><br/>care at the health department increasing from 46 percent in 1980 to<br/><br/>74 percent in 1989. For women under age 18, the proportion<br/><br/>receiving care at the health department increased from a low of 48<br/><br/>percent to 97 percent. In general, the clientele of the health<br/><br/>department had more of the traditional risk factors for infant<br/><br/>death than the others subjects. These included lower levels of<br/><br/>education, younger age, and single marital status. After<br/><br/>controlling for age, education, marital status and twin births,<br/><br/>health department clients were 2.2 times less likely to have an<br/><br/>infant die than were the other subjects. In this study, health<br/><br/>department clients had significantly better prenatal care as<br/><br/>determined by the Kessner Index. Results of this study demonstrate<br/><br/>that prenatal care is associated with decreased infant mortality<br/><br/>and suggests that nurses functioning in an expanded role are<br/><br/>successful in delivering these services.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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