2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147445
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Becoming diabetic: A study of emerging identity (DISS)
Abstract:
Becoming diabetic: A study of emerging identity (DISS)
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Benoliel, Jeanne, DNSc
Title:Retired
The study is designed to consider two interrelated problems: (1) the meaning of diabetes as a social crisis in family living; and (2) the emergence of a new identity – that of diabetic – during the transition into adolescence (ages 10 through 16 years). The theoretical orientation derives from the symbolic interactionist perspective, and the study was designed to view the processes of becoming diabetic as a form of status passage. It is one segment of a larger comparative investigation of chronic illness in adolescence, with the ultimate goal being the development of a theory of chronicity in youth.



The choice of method was guided by the need for flexibility and exploration. A modification of participant observation in the form of semi-structured interview was used for collecting data from nine families and thirteen principal subjects. The procedure of total family interviewing was used. Selection of cases was based on theoretical sampling (rather than random sampling) for the purpose of maximizing comparison. The sample of families differed in these ways: by social class, by number of parents in the home, by number of diabetics in the home, and by years since onset. All were Caucasian and living in urban settings. The sample was limited to young diabetics in contact with diabetic specialists, and the eight girls and five boys ranged in age from five to nineteen years.



The analysis took three directions: (1) identification of sequence and stages by which parents come to function as agents of diabetic treatment, (2) differentiation of family patterns of adaptation to diabetes, and (3) stages by which diabetic identity is formed. Four parental styles of functioning are identified: (1) protective, (2) adaptive, (3) manipulative, and (4) abdicative. The effects of these styles on parent-child relationship and role-performance are discussed and compared. Two types of disruptive influence in families are described: (1) gross interference of regimen with already established child-rearing practices and habits of living, and (2) extreme discord centering on the diabetes (shots, food, “control of disease,” conversation). Five families were in relatively stable adaptation. Four lived by a pattern of “recurring crisis events.”



The developmental and variable character of the emerging identity is its basic feature. Several sets of influencing conditions are important: (1) physical manifestations and required procedures, (2) degree of social restriction imposed, (3) social interactions, especially with physicians and with other diabetics, and (4) parental styles and ongoing patterning of family interactions. Differences in self-image and role-performance are described and considered in terms of type and frequency of contact with other diabetics. Five subjects lived in minimal contact. Five had intermittent and regular contact (at camp). Three lived in households with a diabetic parent in physical regression. By far the most important influence came from family interactions. Parental styles relate directly to conforming and nonconforming role-performance as diabetic.



A typology of diabetic role-performance is presented, and the influence of family on choice of role-performance is discussed – with special attention given to the effects of parental style on self-esteem. Data are then used to consider the general question of “high risk” families – those with adaptations promoting non-conformity with sound health practices. Some inadequacies of the present health system for meeting the teaching and socializing needs of families with chronic illness are identified, and recommendations for intermediary services are offered. The relevance of the findings for theory-building are considered tentative, and recommendations to remedy the gaps in data are offered.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBecoming diabetic: A study of emerging identity (DISS)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147445-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Becoming diabetic: A study of emerging identity (DISS)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Benoliel, Jeanne, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Retired</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The study is designed to consider two interrelated problems: (1) the meaning of diabetes as a social crisis in family living; and (2) the emergence of a new identity &ndash; that of diabetic &ndash; during the transition into adolescence (ages 10 through 16 years). The theoretical orientation derives from the symbolic interactionist perspective, and the study was designed to view the processes of becoming diabetic as a form of status passage. It is one segment of a larger comparative investigation of chronic illness in adolescence, with the ultimate goal being the development of a theory of chronicity in youth.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The choice of method was guided by the need for flexibility and exploration. A modification of participant observation in the form of semi-structured interview was used for collecting data from nine families and thirteen principal subjects. The procedure of total family interviewing was used. Selection of cases was based on theoretical sampling (rather than random sampling) for the purpose of maximizing comparison. The sample of families differed in these ways: by social class, by number of parents in the home, by number of diabetics in the home, and by years since onset. All were Caucasian and living in urban settings. The sample was limited to young diabetics in contact with diabetic specialists, and the eight girls and five boys ranged in age from five to nineteen years.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The analysis took three directions: (1) identification of sequence and stages by which parents come to function as agents of diabetic treatment, (2) differentiation of family patterns of adaptation to diabetes, and (3) stages by which diabetic identity is formed. Four parental styles of functioning are identified: (1) protective, (2) adaptive, (3) manipulative, and (4) abdicative. The effects of these styles on parent-child relationship and role-performance are discussed and compared. Two types of disruptive influence in families are described: (1) gross interference of regimen with already established child-rearing practices and habits of living, and (2) extreme discord centering on the diabetes (shots, food, &ldquo;control of disease,&rdquo; conversation). Five families were in relatively stable adaptation. Four lived by a pattern of &ldquo;recurring crisis events.&rdquo;<br/><br/><br/><br/>The developmental and variable character of the emerging identity is its basic feature. Several sets of influencing conditions are important: (1) physical manifestations and required procedures, (2) degree of social restriction imposed, (3) social interactions, especially with physicians and with other diabetics, and (4) parental styles and ongoing patterning of family interactions. Differences in self-image and role-performance are described and considered in terms of type and frequency of contact with other diabetics. Five subjects lived in minimal contact. Five had intermittent and regular contact (at camp). Three lived in households with a diabetic parent in physical regression. By far the most important influence came from family interactions. Parental styles relate directly to conforming and nonconforming role-performance as diabetic.<br/><br/><br/><br/>A typology of diabetic role-performance is presented, and the influence of family on choice of role-performance is discussed &ndash; with special attention given to the effects of parental style on self-esteem. Data are then used to consider the general question of &ldquo;high risk&rdquo; families &ndash; those with adaptations promoting non-conformity with sound health practices. Some inadequacies of the present health system for meeting the teaching and socializing needs of families with chronic illness are identified, and recommendations for intermediary services are offered. The relevance of the findings for theory-building are considered tentative, and recommendations to remedy the gaps in data are offered.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:29Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.