Severity of Depression Among Pregnant and Parent Teenagers Using the CESD Scale: A Descriptive Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147446
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Severity of Depression Among Pregnant and Parent Teenagers Using the CESD Scale: A Descriptive Study
Abstract:
Severity of Depression Among Pregnant and Parent Teenagers Using the CESD Scale: A Descriptive Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Smith, James
P.I. Institution Name:University of Louisville
As evidenced by nearly two decades of research, adolescent mothers and their infants are at a far greater risk of poor outcomes than are older mothers and their infants (Bavolek, 1979; Bavolek, 1989). Factors compounding these outcomes are poverty, urban residence, welfare dependency, and maternal depression. Approximately 11% of infants born to adolescent mothers are victims of child abuse, while infants born to 20-21 year old mothers account for only 5% of the reported cases (Maynard, 1996). Further research suggests that early mother and infant interactions have a significant impact upon the development of the child (Diehl, 1997). A current study, conducted by Dr. Debbie Thomas (University of Louisville, School of Nursing), is designed to assess and improve parenting skills, health practices, and infant outcomes within an aggregate at high risk for problems such as low birth weight and infant mistreatment. The theoretical framework used to develop and implement the service oriented parenting assessment and intervention project is based on an integrative framework. Concepts and techniques from many contemporary models are adapted to fit the needs of the groups. The conceptual framework takes into account the thinking, feeling, and behaving dimensions of the human experience. Within this study lies a component of maternal depression on a severity continuum. Past research has indicated that parental depression is significantly associated with offspring depression (Kramer, Warner, Olfson, Ebanks, Chaput, & Weissman, 1998). Other research reveals that a history of maternal depression is associated with low parental care and increased childhood injuries (Duggan, Sham, Minne, Lee, & Murray, 1998). Both of these examples illustrate the need for early detection of maternal depression. The purpose of this descriptive study is to analyze data collected from the aforementioned study using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CESD). In this study, the CESD is administered as a pre-test and post-test to two groups of pregnant and/or parenting teenagers. Means of scores, range, and standard deviation for the groups will be analyzed. Data will be analyzed to determine results along the depression continuum in this pregnant and parenting teen population. Participants are considered at-risk teens who are in and out of State custody. One group is recruited through the Home of the Innocents Pregnant and Parent Teen Program in Louisville, KY. The second group is recruited from Riverview Alternative High School in Shepherdsville, KY. This area of research is significant to nursing because of the need to optimize the nurturing environment of children, especially those who are considered to be at risk for early childhood developmental problems. Early diagnosis and treatment of depression in adolescent mothers will likely decrease various known developmental psychopathologies of early childhood.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSeverity of Depression Among Pregnant and Parent Teenagers Using the CESD Scale: A Descriptive Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147446-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Severity of Depression Among Pregnant and Parent Teenagers Using the CESD Scale: A Descriptive Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith, James</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Louisville</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jimsmith@louisville.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As evidenced by nearly two decades of research, adolescent mothers and their infants are at a far greater risk of poor outcomes than are older mothers and their infants (Bavolek, 1979; Bavolek, 1989). Factors compounding these outcomes are poverty, urban residence, welfare dependency, and maternal depression. Approximately 11% of infants born to adolescent mothers are victims of child abuse, while infants born to 20-21 year old mothers account for only 5% of the reported cases (Maynard, 1996). Further research suggests that early mother and infant interactions have a significant impact upon the development of the child (Diehl, 1997). A current study, conducted by Dr. Debbie Thomas (University of Louisville, School of Nursing), is designed to assess and improve parenting skills, health practices, and infant outcomes within an aggregate at high risk for problems such as low birth weight and infant mistreatment. The theoretical framework used to develop and implement the service oriented parenting assessment and intervention project is based on an integrative framework. Concepts and techniques from many contemporary models are adapted to fit the needs of the groups. The conceptual framework takes into account the thinking, feeling, and behaving dimensions of the human experience. Within this study lies a component of maternal depression on a severity continuum. Past research has indicated that parental depression is significantly associated with offspring depression (Kramer, Warner, Olfson, Ebanks, Chaput, &amp; Weissman, 1998). Other research reveals that a history of maternal depression is associated with low parental care and increased childhood injuries (Duggan, Sham, Minne, Lee, &amp; Murray, 1998). Both of these examples illustrate the need for early detection of maternal depression. The purpose of this descriptive study is to analyze data collected from the aforementioned study using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CESD). In this study, the CESD is administered as a pre-test and post-test to two groups of pregnant and/or parenting teenagers. Means of scores, range, and standard deviation for the groups will be analyzed. Data will be analyzed to determine results along the depression continuum in this pregnant and parenting teen population. Participants are considered at-risk teens who are in and out of State custody. One group is recruited through the Home of the Innocents Pregnant and Parent Teen Program in Louisville, KY. The second group is recruited from Riverview Alternative High School in Shepherdsville, KY. This area of research is significant to nursing because of the need to optimize the nurturing environment of children, especially those who are considered to be at risk for early childhood developmental problems. Early diagnosis and treatment of depression in adolescent mothers will likely decrease various known developmental psychopathologies of early childhood.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:30Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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