2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147454
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cross Stitching: Lessons Learned
Abstract:
Cross Stitching: Lessons Learned
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Stuenkel, Diane
P.I. Institution Name:San Jose State University
Stitching and nursing education? An unlikely mix. However, the process of learning to cross stitch--from potholders on my grandmother’s front porch, to eventually being selected to stitch samples for a national stitching publication--may offer some clues. Lessons learned from cross-stitching: 1. When the floss gets tangled, the stitches are uneven, and more stitches are being ripped out than put in, walk away. There is wisdom in doing things (stitching, writing, studying) when one is “in the mood”. 2. Large projects take time. Completing a large cross stitch piece, a nursing care plan, or any large project, requires breaking it down into a series of small, manageable tasks. For example, working on the angel’s wing tip or a ribbon. 3. Details count. Adding a pewter metallic thread for one stitch--the purse clasp--caused the framer to remark on how that one stitch really “made” the piece. The art of nursing lies in teaching our students to think creatively when individualizing care. 4. The back should look as neat as the front. The piece will look better and lay better if it is done correctly. A good, solid nursing background may not “show”, but it provides a foundation for nursing practice that will serve our future nurses well throughout their career. 5. It takes practice. One does not move from novice to expert--whether in stitching or nursing--in a flash. While keeping my hands busy, stitching has afforded me the time to reflect on my nursing practice. Reflection can help us learn from mistakes, identify strengths and weaknesses, and formulate an action plan for the future. These lessons can be applied to nursing education. Assisting students to develop reflection and self-evaluation skills may facilitate their movement along the novice to expert continuum. Encouraging our nursing students to develop time management skills, pay attention to details, and to think creatively will serve them well as nurses and as life-long learners.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCross Stitching: Lessons Learneden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147454-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cross Stitching: Lessons Learned</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stuenkel, Diane</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">San Jose State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dstuen@earthlink.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Stitching and nursing education? An unlikely mix. However, the process of learning to cross stitch--from potholders on my grandmother&rsquo;s front porch, to eventually being selected to stitch samples for a national stitching publication--may offer some clues. Lessons learned from cross-stitching: 1. When the floss gets tangled, the stitches are uneven, and more stitches are being ripped out than put in, walk away. There is wisdom in doing things (stitching, writing, studying) when one is &ldquo;in the mood&rdquo;. 2. Large projects take time. Completing a large cross stitch piece, a nursing care plan, or any large project, requires breaking it down into a series of small, manageable tasks. For example, working on the angel&rsquo;s wing tip or a ribbon. 3. Details count. Adding a pewter metallic thread for one stitch--the purse clasp--caused the framer to remark on how that one stitch really &ldquo;made&rdquo; the piece. The art of nursing lies in teaching our students to think creatively when individualizing care. 4. The back should look as neat as the front. The piece will look better and lay better if it is done correctly. A good, solid nursing background may not &ldquo;show&rdquo;, but it provides a foundation for nursing practice that will serve our future nurses well throughout their career. 5. It takes practice. One does not move from novice to expert--whether in stitching or nursing--in a flash. While keeping my hands busy, stitching has afforded me the time to reflect on my nursing practice. Reflection can help us learn from mistakes, identify strengths and weaknesses, and formulate an action plan for the future. These lessons can be applied to nursing education. Assisting students to develop reflection and self-evaluation skills may facilitate their movement along the novice to expert continuum. Encouraging our nursing students to develop time management skills, pay attention to details, and to think creatively will serve them well as nurses and as life-long learners.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:35Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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