The Effects of a School-based Nutrition Education Intervention on Self-Efficacy for Healthy Eating, Usual Food Choices, Dietary Knowledge, and Fruit, Vegetable, and Fat Consumption in Adolescents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147455
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of a School-based Nutrition Education Intervention on Self-Efficacy for Healthy Eating, Usual Food Choices, Dietary Knowledge, and Fruit, Vegetable, and Fat Consumption in Adolescents
Abstract:
The Effects of a School-based Nutrition Education Intervention on Self-Efficacy for Healthy Eating, Usual Food Choices, Dietary Knowledge, and Fruit, Vegetable, and Fat Consumption in Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Long, JoAnn, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Lubbock Christian University
Title:Associate Professor
This study addressed the use of nutrition education to affect the dietary habits of adolescents in the context of self-efficacy. National data indicate that 63% of the more than 20 million U.S. adolescents engage in risk taking behaviors including insufficient fruit and vegetable consumption and excessive consumption of high fat foods. These poor dietary practices tend to track into adulthood contributing to the development of obesity, cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes, and cancer. The significant role diet as one of the few modifiable risk factors in the development of chronic disease continues to be a focus of public health efforts and is the background for this study. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a nutrition education intervention on self-efficacy for healthy eating in adolescents. Using social cognitive theory as a conceptual framework, a theory and behaviorally focused intervention was compared to a traditional classroom curriculum in 121 randomly selected adolescents in an intervention and comparison junior high school using a two-group, two-time quasi-experimental design. The intervention group received 10 hours of classroom instruction and 5 hours of developmentally relevant technology-based nutrition modules placed on the WWW. The comparison group received the traditional classroom nutrition education within the standardized school curriculum. Specific aims were 1) to test the effects of the nutrition intervention on the following: a) self-efficacy for increased fruit and vegetable consumption; b) self-efficacy for the consumption of lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods; c) usual food choices for lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods; d) dietary knowledge for lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods; e) dietary knowledge for fruits and vegetables; f) fruit, vegetable, and fat consumption; 2) to test the association between: a) dietary knowledge of lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods and self-efficacy for lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods; b) dietary knowledge of fruits and vegetables and self-efficacy for fruit and vegetable consumption; and c) among self-efficacy, fruit and vegetable, and fat consumption and usual food choices for fat, saturated fat, lower sodium foods. Eleven hypotheses were tested. The effects of the nutrition intervention on the following: H1: self-efficacy for fruit and vegetable consumption, was accepted (p < .01). H2: self-efficacy for consumption of lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium, was accepted (p < .001). H3: usual food choices for lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium choices, was accepted (p < .001). H4: dietary knowledge for lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium choices was accepted (p < .03). H5: dietary knowledge for fruits and vegetables was accepted (p < .005). H6: fruit, vegetable, and fat consumption, was not accepted (p < .30 for fruits, p < 1.02 for vegetables, and, p < -1.23 for fats. The association was tested between the following: H7: dietary knowledge of lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods and self-efficacy for lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods, was accepted (p < .001). H8: dietary knowledge of fruits and vegetables and fruit and vegetable self-efficacy was not accepted (p < .08). H9: a) self-efficacy for fruit and vegetable consumption was not accepted (p < .08) for fruits and (p < .10) for vegetables. H10: self-efficacy for lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods and consumption of lower fat and sodium foods was accepted (p < .004) for fat, and (p < .02) for sodium. H11: usual food choice for lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods and self-efficacy for lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods, was accepted (p < .0001). The nutrition education intervention tested in this study significantly improved subjects self-efficacy for healthy eating, dietary knowledge, and the dietary choices of what they would usually choose to eat, most of the time, as compared to the control group. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of using a theory-guided, behaviorally based intervention which incorporated a developmentally-relevant, technology-based approach to nutrition education in an adolescent population. These findings should be replicated and encourage the continuation of school-based research to affect the dietary habits of our youth and has implications for minimizing the impact of chronic disease within our society.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of a School-based Nutrition Education Intervention on Self-Efficacy for Healthy Eating, Usual Food Choices, Dietary Knowledge, and Fruit, Vegetable, and Fat Consumption in Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147455-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of a School-based Nutrition Education Intervention on Self-Efficacy for Healthy Eating, Usual Food Choices, Dietary Knowledge, and Fruit, Vegetable, and Fat Consumption in Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Long, JoAnn, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lubbock Christian University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">joann.long@lcu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study addressed the use of nutrition education to affect the dietary habits of adolescents in the context of self-efficacy. National data indicate that 63% of the more than 20 million U.S. adolescents engage in risk taking behaviors including insufficient fruit and vegetable consumption and excessive consumption of high fat foods. These poor dietary practices tend to track into adulthood contributing to the development of obesity, cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes, and cancer. The significant role diet as one of the few modifiable risk factors in the development of chronic disease continues to be a focus of public health efforts and is the background for this study. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a nutrition education intervention on self-efficacy for healthy eating in adolescents. Using social cognitive theory as a conceptual framework, a theory and behaviorally focused intervention was compared to a traditional classroom curriculum in 121 randomly selected adolescents in an intervention and comparison junior high school using a two-group, two-time quasi-experimental design. The intervention group received 10 hours of classroom instruction and 5 hours of developmentally relevant technology-based nutrition modules placed on the WWW. The comparison group received the traditional classroom nutrition education within the standardized school curriculum. Specific aims were 1) to test the effects of the nutrition intervention on the following: a) self-efficacy for increased fruit and vegetable consumption; b) self-efficacy for the consumption of lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods; c) usual food choices for lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods; d) dietary knowledge for lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods; e) dietary knowledge for fruits and vegetables; f) fruit, vegetable, and fat consumption; 2) to test the association between: a) dietary knowledge of lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods and self-efficacy for lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods; b) dietary knowledge of fruits and vegetables and self-efficacy for fruit and vegetable consumption; and c) among self-efficacy, fruit and vegetable, and fat consumption and usual food choices for fat, saturated fat, lower sodium foods. Eleven hypotheses were tested. The effects of the nutrition intervention on the following: H1: self-efficacy for fruit and vegetable consumption, was accepted (p &lt; .01). H2: self-efficacy for consumption of lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium, was accepted (p &lt; .001). H3: usual food choices for lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium choices, was accepted (p &lt; .001). H4: dietary knowledge for lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium choices was accepted (p &lt; .03). H5: dietary knowledge for fruits and vegetables was accepted (p &lt; .005). H6: fruit, vegetable, and fat consumption, was not accepted (p &lt; .30 for fruits, p &lt; 1.02 for vegetables, and, p &lt; -1.23 for fats. The association was tested between the following: H7: dietary knowledge of lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods and self-efficacy for lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods, was accepted (p &lt; .001). H8: dietary knowledge of fruits and vegetables and fruit and vegetable self-efficacy was not accepted (p &lt; .08). H9: a) self-efficacy for fruit and vegetable consumption was not accepted (p &lt; .08) for fruits and (p &lt; .10) for vegetables. H10: self-efficacy for lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods and consumption of lower fat and sodium foods was accepted (p &lt; .004) for fat, and (p &lt; .02) for sodium. H11: usual food choice for lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods and self-efficacy for lower fat, saturated fat, and lower sodium foods, was accepted (p &lt; .0001). The nutrition education intervention tested in this study significantly improved subjects self-efficacy for healthy eating, dietary knowledge, and the dietary choices of what they would usually choose to eat, most of the time, as compared to the control group. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of using a theory-guided, behaviorally based intervention which incorporated a developmentally-relevant, technology-based approach to nutrition education in an adolescent population. These findings should be replicated and encourage the continuation of school-based research to affect the dietary habits of our youth and has implications for minimizing the impact of chronic disease within our society.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:36Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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