Nurse executives’ perceptions of their personal and organizational value congruence and leadership behaviors: Transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147456
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse executives’ perceptions of their personal and organizational value congruence and leadership behaviors: Transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire
Abstract:
Nurse executives’ perceptions of their personal and organizational value congruence and leadership behaviors: Transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Perkel, Linda, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Barry University
Title:Associate Professor
Nurse leaders struggle to provide for the delivery of humanistic and holistic healthcare that is consistent with nursing values in a changing economic environment. There is concern that nurse executives find it increasingly difficult to reconcile the differences between organizational economics and their personal and professional identities. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between nurse executives perceived personal and organizational value congruence, their level of education, years of administrative experience, the for-profit versus not-for profit status of their employing organization, and their leadership behaviors: transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire. Value congruence was measured using The Values Analysis Worksheet (Harrington & Preziosi, 1998) (VAW) and leadership behaviors were measured using the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (5x Short) (MLQ) (Bass & Avolio, 1995). A mailed survey was sent to a 27% random sample (n=900) of the Nurse Executives from a population of 3314 nurse executives from American Hospital Association hospitals located east of the Mississippi. A total of 411 (45.6%) usable responses were returned. The mean total self-score for personal values was 82.56 while the mean total organization score was 68.84 indicating that nurse executives rated their personal values higher than the values of their employing organization. A moderate degree of congruence between personal and organizational values (r = .42) was found. The four personal values that nurse executives ranked highest were integrity, honesty, respect, and loyalty. The four values that had the greatest value incongruity were honesty, sense of humor, feedback system, and willingness to help others. Analyses of the MLQ indicated that the nurse executives in this study perceive their leadership style to be predominantly transformational (M = 3.44). Multiple regression analyses were used to assess the effect of the independent variables: value congruence score, level of education, length of management and administrative experience, and for-profit versus not-for-profit status on leadership behaviors: transformational, transactional, and laissez faire. No significant relationships were found. Much was learned in this study about nurse executives’ perception of personal and organizational values. Much more needs to done in order to understand how personal and organizational value congruence relates to leadership behavior.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse executives’ perceptions of their personal and organizational value congruence and leadership behaviors: Transformational, transactional, and laissez-faireen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147456-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurse executives&rsquo; perceptions of their personal and organizational value congruence and leadership behaviors: Transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Perkel, Linda, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Barry University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lperkel@mail.barry.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurse leaders struggle to provide for the delivery of humanistic and holistic healthcare that is consistent with nursing values in a changing economic environment. There is concern that nurse executives find it increasingly difficult to reconcile the differences between organizational economics and their personal and professional identities. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between nurse executives perceived personal and organizational value congruence, their level of education, years of administrative experience, the for-profit versus not-for profit status of their employing organization, and their leadership behaviors: transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire. Value congruence was measured using The Values Analysis Worksheet (Harrington &amp; Preziosi, 1998) (VAW) and leadership behaviors were measured using the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (5x Short) (MLQ) (Bass &amp; Avolio, 1995). A mailed survey was sent to a 27% random sample (n=900) of the Nurse Executives from a population of 3314 nurse executives from American Hospital Association hospitals located east of the Mississippi. A total of 411 (45.6%) usable responses were returned. The mean total self-score for personal values was 82.56 while the mean total organization score was 68.84 indicating that nurse executives rated their personal values higher than the values of their employing organization. A moderate degree of congruence between personal and organizational values (r = .42) was found. The four personal values that nurse executives ranked highest were integrity, honesty, respect, and loyalty. The four values that had the greatest value incongruity were honesty, sense of humor, feedback system, and willingness to help others. Analyses of the MLQ indicated that the nurse executives in this study perceive their leadership style to be predominantly transformational (M = 3.44). Multiple regression analyses were used to assess the effect of the independent variables: value congruence score, level of education, length of management and administrative experience, and for-profit versus not-for-profit status on leadership behaviors: transformational, transactional, and laissez faire. No significant relationships were found. Much was learned in this study about nurse executives&rsquo; perception of personal and organizational values. Much more needs to done in order to understand how personal and organizational value congruence relates to leadership behavior.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:36Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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