2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147459
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Lived Experience of Men and Women with Multiple Sclerosis
Abstract:
The Lived Experience of Men and Women with Multiple Sclerosis
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Buchanan, Emily
Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, degenerative disease affecting young adults between the ages of 20 and 40, women more frequently than men, white more often than blacks. MS may be episodic or continuous but the presence of the sometimes invisible symptoms (loss of vision, fatigue, incontinence) and the episodic nature and uncertainty of symptoms can create a constant sense of vigilance or support the use of denial. Patients with MS experience a variety of symptoms such as motor and sensory problems and cognitive impairment and may have vague and transient symptoms before a definitive diagnosis is made. Indeed, family, friends, and even nursing support may be elusive, leaving one feeling lonely, frightened, and insecure. Although the diagnosis may bring relief, it also brings new demands and fears for patients and their support systems. The purpose of this research was to investigate the lived experience of men and women with MS and to identify their needs from their perspectives. Qualitative focus group design was used. The focus groups were audio taped with the participants’ full knowledge and written consent. The tapes were transcribed verbatim and then reviewed by the three investigators independently. This was followed by discussion and consensus agreement on the identification of group themes. One focus group included 4 men diagnosed with MS from 2 to 15 years. The other focus group included 6 women diagnosed with MS from 1 ½ to 15 years. Although one woman stated that her symptoms started 28 years ago. The type of MS varied although some subjects identified progression of symptoms and even believed that all types become progressive. Five themes were identified: (1) nobody’s listening, (2) fight your own fight, (3) denial, (4) slam dunk, and (5) pick and choose. Both groups identified the need to be taken seriously and to have someone listen to their concerns. Although the Study is limited by the small convenience sample and variability in length of diagnosis, subjects’ comments suggested specific nursing interventions. A longitudinal intervention study with a larger sample size is needed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Lived Experience of Men and Women with Multiple Sclerosisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147459-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Lived Experience of Men and Women with Multiple Sclerosis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Buchanan, Emily</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">emilybuchanan@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, degenerative disease affecting young adults between the ages of 20 and 40, women more frequently than men, white more often than blacks. MS may be episodic or continuous but the presence of the sometimes invisible symptoms (loss of vision, fatigue, incontinence) and the episodic nature and uncertainty of symptoms can create a constant sense of vigilance or support the use of denial. Patients with MS experience a variety of symptoms such as motor and sensory problems and cognitive impairment and may have vague and transient symptoms before a definitive diagnosis is made. Indeed, family, friends, and even nursing support may be elusive, leaving one feeling lonely, frightened, and insecure. Although the diagnosis may bring relief, it also brings new demands and fears for patients and their support systems. The purpose of this research was to investigate the lived experience of men and women with MS and to identify their needs from their perspectives. Qualitative focus group design was used. The focus groups were audio taped with the participants&rsquo; full knowledge and written consent. The tapes were transcribed verbatim and then reviewed by the three investigators independently. This was followed by discussion and consensus agreement on the identification of group themes. One focus group included 4 men diagnosed with MS from 2 to 15 years. The other focus group included 6 women diagnosed with MS from 1 &frac12; to 15 years. Although one woman stated that her symptoms started 28 years ago. The type of MS varied although some subjects identified progression of symptoms and even believed that all types become progressive. Five themes were identified: (1) nobody&rsquo;s listening, (2) fight your own fight, (3) denial, (4) slam dunk, and (5) pick and choose. Both groups identified the need to be taken seriously and to have someone listen to their concerns. Although the Study is limited by the small convenience sample and variability in length of diagnosis, subjects&rsquo; comments suggested specific nursing interventions. A longitudinal intervention study with a larger sample size is needed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:38Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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