Skin-to-Skin Contact in the Neonatal Period: A Review of the Literature and Project Intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147462
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Skin-to-Skin Contact in the Neonatal Period: A Review of the Literature and Project Intervention
Abstract:
Skin-to-Skin Contact in the Neonatal Period: A Review of the Literature and Project Intervention
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Melven, Kristi
While a great deal of research has been conducted throughout the past two decades on the benefits of skin-to-skin contact in the well-being of hospitalized infants, many hospitals in the United States do not have established guidelines for the practice. Skin-to-skin contact, termed "kangaroo care" because of the marsupial method of caring for their young in a pouch, involves early and frequent skin-to-skin contact between infant and parent to promote bonding, improve thermoregulation and oxygenation, reduce crying and facilitate breastfeeding in nursing mothers. To assist in the incorporation of this practice into a greater number of Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU), current research was reviewed and protocols and educational materials were obtained from prominent researchers in the field. Consultation with the clinical educators and staff of one NICU launched action to develop protocol and implementation guidelines for skin-to-skin care. Preliminary research also suggests that skin-to-skin contact may be beneficial in the resolution of transient respiratory distress in term or near-term newborns. Avenues for further study utilizing skin-to-skin contact with adjunct therapy of warm, humidified oxygen were explored.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSkin-to-Skin Contact in the Neonatal Period: A Review of the Literature and Project Interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147462-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Skin-to-Skin Contact in the Neonatal Period: A Review of the Literature and Project Intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Melven, Kristi</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">klm5@email.byu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">While a great deal of research has been conducted throughout the past two decades on the benefits of skin-to-skin contact in the well-being of hospitalized infants, many hospitals in the United States do not have established guidelines for the practice. Skin-to-skin contact, termed &quot;kangaroo care&quot; because of the marsupial method of caring for their young in a pouch, involves early and frequent skin-to-skin contact between infant and parent to promote bonding, improve thermoregulation and oxygenation, reduce crying and facilitate breastfeeding in nursing mothers. To assist in the incorporation of this practice into a greater number of Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU), current research was reviewed and protocols and educational materials were obtained from prominent researchers in the field. Consultation with the clinical educators and staff of one NICU launched action to develop protocol and implementation guidelines for skin-to-skin care. Preliminary research also suggests that skin-to-skin contact may be beneficial in the resolution of transient respiratory distress in term or near-term newborns. Avenues for further study utilizing skin-to-skin contact with adjunct therapy of warm, humidified oxygen were explored.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:40Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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