Life Satisfaction Among Older Adults Living in the Community Setting

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147463
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Life Satisfaction Among Older Adults Living in the Community Setting
Abstract:
Life Satisfaction Among Older Adults Living in the Community Setting
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Zehr, David
P.I. Institution Name:Vincennes University
The purpose of this predictive, field study was to replicate a similar study (Sparks, 1988) by investigating variables that predict life satisfaction in elderly persons. A synthesis of activity theory and social learning theory was the foundation of the study. One research question was addressed: Among verbally responsive, elderly adults living in their own home or apartment or in the home of another, which of the following variables best predict life satisfaction: social interaction, perceived situational control, self?esteem, or mobility, with social position and health status held constant? A convenience sample of seventy elderly community residents participated in the study. Instruments used were the Life Satisfaction Index A (18 items, alpha .81); three subscales from the Self Evaluation of Life Function Scale: physical disability/mobility (13 items, alpha .88), social satisfaction (6 items, alpha .80), and self-esteem (7 items, alpha .79); the Perceived Control Measure (16 items, alpha .79); Hollingshead's Two Factor Index of Social Position (2 items, alpha .78) and the Self-Rated Health Subscale of the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Multilevel Assessment Instrument (4 items, alpha .74). With the influence of health and social position were held constant, social interaction was the only additional significant predictor of life satisfaction. This model explained forty-one percent of the variation in life satisfaction (R2=.41, F=15.2, p=.000). When health and social position were not held constant, social interaction, perceived control, and social position were significant predictors of life satisfaction accounting for forty-two percent of the variation in life satisfaction (R2 =.42, F=15.68, p=.000). In the original study, perceived control and social interaction were added to social position and health as predictors and accounted for fifty percent on the variation in life satisfaction. The findings strongly support social learning theory and activity theory. Implications for nursing practice, education, and research focus on assessment and interventions relative to promoting and maintaining health, perceived control, and social interaction among elderly persons living in the community.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLife Satisfaction Among Older Adults Living in the Community Settingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147463-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Life Satisfaction Among Older Adults Living in the Community Setting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zehr, David</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Vincennes University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">abirdfan@psci.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this predictive, field study was to replicate a similar study (Sparks, 1988) by investigating variables that predict life satisfaction in elderly persons. A synthesis of activity theory and social learning theory was the foundation of the study. One research question was addressed: Among verbally responsive, elderly adults living in their own home or apartment or in the home of another, which of the following variables best predict life satisfaction: social interaction, perceived situational control, self?esteem, or mobility, with social position and health status held constant? A convenience sample of seventy elderly community residents participated in the study. Instruments used were the Life Satisfaction Index A (18 items, alpha .81); three subscales from the Self Evaluation of Life Function Scale: physical disability/mobility (13 items, alpha .88), social satisfaction (6 items, alpha .80), and self-esteem (7 items, alpha .79); the Perceived Control Measure (16 items, alpha .79); Hollingshead's Two Factor Index of Social Position (2 items, alpha .78) and the Self-Rated Health Subscale of the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Multilevel Assessment Instrument (4 items, alpha .74). With the influence of health and social position were held constant, social interaction was the only additional significant predictor of life satisfaction. This model explained forty-one percent of the variation in life satisfaction (R2=.41, F=15.2, p=.000). When health and social position were not held constant, social interaction, perceived control, and social position were significant predictors of life satisfaction accounting for forty-two percent of the variation in life satisfaction (R2 =.42, F=15.68, p=.000). In the original study, perceived control and social interaction were added to social position and health as predictors and accounted for fifty percent on the variation in life satisfaction. The findings strongly support social learning theory and activity theory. Implications for nursing practice, education, and research focus on assessment and interventions relative to promoting and maintaining health, perceived control, and social interaction among elderly persons living in the community.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:40Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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