2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147472
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sexual harassment in health care
Abstract:
Sexual harassment in health care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Madison, Jeanne
P.I. Institution Name:University of New England
Objective/Purpose: To explore how Australian registered nurses (RNs) identified antecedent contextual conditions associated with episodes of harassment in the health care work place. Design: Qualitative, using 16 unstructured interviews with registered nurses in Australia. Sample: Convenience sample comprised of 16 volunteers interviewed for approximately 1 hour each. Setting: RNs practicing in a variety of clinical settings across Australia. Variables/propositions: 1. That the experience of harassment varied with individuals. 2. That harassment is complex and part of a process that includes both an individual and social contextual component. 3. That there are different types and characteristics of harassers. 4. That there are rationalizations used by recipients of harassment that contribute to the lack of an assertive response. 5. That there are powerful ‘political’ consequences to the experience of harassment for individual nurses as well as the nursing profession. Measures/Instrument: Semi-structured in-depth interviews. Findings: That 4 antecedent contextual conditions are associated with harassment in the health care work place. 1. Silence, 2. Lack of education, 3. Absence of supportive behaviours, 4. Myths and stereotypes. Conclusions: The absence of research and publications regarding workplace harassment in the Australian health care literature is notable when compared with the U.S. and Britain. This limits the availability of commonly used and accepted descriptive language to identify and label harassing episodes. Informants described unsupportive behaviours from nursing colleagues and leaders which reduces the reporting of harassment in the workplace. The lack of education about harassing behaviours in the Australian health care workplace was noted by informants. Lastly, the close links between harassment experienced by RNs and nursing stereotypes and ‘myths’ were clear to the informants. Implications: Nursing leaders are responsible for the health care workplace. As the critical mass in almost all health care organizations, all nurses must have a clear understanding of issues associated with a harassing workplace. Encouraging nurse leaders not only to take greater responsibility for changing certain characteristics of the workplace, but also supporting actions by women who have confronted inappropriate workplace behaviour, are important ways to broaden understanding of harassment in health care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSexual harassment in health careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147472-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sexual harassment in health care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Madison, Jeanne</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New England</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jmadison@metz.une.edu.au</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective/Purpose: To explore how Australian registered nurses (RNs) identified antecedent contextual conditions associated with episodes of harassment in the health care work place. Design: Qualitative, using 16 unstructured interviews with registered nurses in Australia. Sample: Convenience sample comprised of 16 volunteers interviewed for approximately 1 hour each. Setting: RNs practicing in a variety of clinical settings across Australia. Variables/propositions: 1. That the experience of harassment varied with individuals. 2. That harassment is complex and part of a process that includes both an individual and social contextual component. 3. That there are different types and characteristics of harassers. 4. That there are rationalizations used by recipients of harassment that contribute to the lack of an assertive response. 5. That there are powerful &lsquo;political&rsquo; consequences to the experience of harassment for individual nurses as well as the nursing profession. Measures/Instrument: Semi-structured in-depth interviews. Findings: That 4 antecedent contextual conditions are associated with harassment in the health care work place. 1. Silence, 2. Lack of education, 3. Absence of supportive behaviours, 4. Myths and stereotypes. Conclusions: The absence of research and publications regarding workplace harassment in the Australian health care literature is notable when compared with the U.S. and Britain. This limits the availability of commonly used and accepted descriptive language to identify and label harassing episodes. Informants described unsupportive behaviours from nursing colleagues and leaders which reduces the reporting of harassment in the workplace. The lack of education about harassing behaviours in the Australian health care workplace was noted by informants. Lastly, the close links between harassment experienced by RNs and nursing stereotypes and &lsquo;myths&rsquo; were clear to the informants. Implications: Nursing leaders are responsible for the health care workplace. As the critical mass in almost all health care organizations, all nurses must have a clear understanding of issues associated with a harassing workplace. Encouraging nurse leaders not only to take greater responsibility for changing certain characteristics of the workplace, but also supporting actions by women who have confronted inappropriate workplace behaviour, are important ways to broaden understanding of harassment in health care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:46Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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