Stress and uncertainty in persons with cardiovascular disease who are online computer support group users: Do gender and age make a difference?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147473
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stress and uncertainty in persons with cardiovascular disease who are online computer support group users: Do gender and age make a difference?
Abstract:
Stress and uncertainty in persons with cardiovascular disease who are online computer support group users: Do gender and age make a difference?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:LaCoursiere, Sheryl
P.I. Institution Name:University of Connecticut
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this research was to determine, in persons with cardiovascular disease who are online computer support group users: (1) if there is a significant difference in stress and uncertainty between females and males (2) if there a significant difference in stress and uncertainty among persons 20-34, 35-54, and 55-74 years old (3) if the effect of age is significantly different in females and males. DESIGN: Secondary analysis of a descriptive/correlational stress and uncertainty study, using a 2 x 3 Factorial Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA). SAMPLE: 64 persons with cardiovascular disease who are online computer support group users. SETTING: The study was conducted electronically. Participants were recruited from commercial services (America Online, Prodigy, Compuserve), Internet newsgroups (sci.med, sci.med.cardiology, sci.med.pharmacy), electronic discussion lists (TRNSPLNT, ACHD, pdheart-l), and referrals from nursing and medical discussion lists (NURSENET, NURSERES, NRSINGED, Openheart-L). NAMES OF VARIABLES: Independent variables were gender (female, male) and age (20-34, 35-54, 55-74 years old). Dependent variables were stress and uncertainty, as measured by summed scores on the Uncertainty Stress Scale. MEASURES/INSTRUMENTS: Uncertainty Stress Scale (Hilton, 1994). FINDINGS: (1) There is not a significant difference between the stress and uncertainty ratings of males and females on the multivariate main effect for gender (Wilk's Lambda=.98080, p=.576). (2) There is not a significant difference between the stress and uncertainty ratings of persons in the 20-34, 35-54, and 55-74 years old age categories on the multivariate main effect for age (Wilk's Lambda=.95343, p=.428). (3) There is not a significant interaction effect overall between gender and age (Wilks's Lambda= .95158, p= .583). CONCLUSIONS: The limitations of this study are a small sample and variability in cell sizes. Although there were no significant findings from the MANOVA, several trends by gender and age were noted, which should be interpreted cautiously. There was a progressive decrease in mean stress scores for females, and mean uncertainty scores in males, as the years representing the age categories increased. However, mean stress scores in males and mean uncertainty scores both increased from 20-34 to the 35-54 year old age categories, then declined in the 55-74 year old age category. Thus, mean stress scores for males and mean uncertainty scores for females follow a similar trend, as do mean stress scores for females and mean uncertainty scores for males. The 55-74 year old age group had the lowest mean scores for both stress and uncertainty. IMPLICATIONS: The findings of this study reveal the need to further assess age differences by gender in persons with cardiovascular disease who are online computer support group users. Generalizability of findings in this Internet population is limited. However, six million Americans seek health information and support on the Internet daily (The Pew Internet and American Life Report, 2000). Cardiovascular disease affects 59.7 million Americans annually (American Heart Association, 2000). Differences between those with cardiovascular disease in the general population, and those who use the Internet, must be assessed to determine demographic differences that may influence perception of stress and uncertainty. Although the numbers of persons with cardiovascular disease who use online health care services is unknown, the increasing use of the Internet for health support calls for assessment of this population so that effective telehealth interventions can be developed for those who are unable to participate in traditional support groups. Further assessment of baseline perceptions of stress and uncertainty will allow development of targeted interventions intended for differing audiences, particularly by age and gender. In addition, decreased length of hospital stays, and the growing nursing shortage highlight the need to develop cost-effective and time-sensitive nursing services that may benefit the most numbers of persons with cardiovascular disease, and take into account stress and uncertainty concerns in this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStress and uncertainty in persons with cardiovascular disease who are online computer support group users: Do gender and age make a difference?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147473-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stress and uncertainty in persons with cardiovascular disease who are online computer support group users: Do gender and age make a difference?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">LaCoursiere, Sheryl</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Connecticut</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sheryl.lacoursiere@uconn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">OBJECTIVE: The objective of this research was to determine, in persons with cardiovascular disease who are online computer support group users: (1) if there is a significant difference in stress and uncertainty between females and males (2) if there a significant difference in stress and uncertainty among persons 20-34, 35-54, and 55-74 years old (3) if the effect of age is significantly different in females and males. DESIGN: Secondary analysis of a descriptive/correlational stress and uncertainty study, using a 2 x 3 Factorial Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA). SAMPLE: 64 persons with cardiovascular disease who are online computer support group users. SETTING: The study was conducted electronically. Participants were recruited from commercial services (America Online, Prodigy, Compuserve), Internet newsgroups (sci.med, sci.med.cardiology, sci.med.pharmacy), electronic discussion lists (TRNSPLNT, ACHD, pdheart-l), and referrals from nursing and medical discussion lists (NURSENET, NURSERES, NRSINGED, Openheart-L). NAMES OF VARIABLES: Independent variables were gender (female, male) and age (20-34, 35-54, 55-74 years old). Dependent variables were stress and uncertainty, as measured by summed scores on the Uncertainty Stress Scale. MEASURES/INSTRUMENTS: Uncertainty Stress Scale (Hilton, 1994). FINDINGS: (1) There is not a significant difference between the stress and uncertainty ratings of males and females on the multivariate main effect for gender (Wilk's Lambda=.98080, p=.576). (2) There is not a significant difference between the stress and uncertainty ratings of persons in the 20-34, 35-54, and 55-74 years old age categories on the multivariate main effect for age (Wilk's Lambda=.95343, p=.428). (3) There is not a significant interaction effect overall between gender and age (Wilks's Lambda= .95158, p= .583). CONCLUSIONS: The limitations of this study are a small sample and variability in cell sizes. Although there were no significant findings from the MANOVA, several trends by gender and age were noted, which should be interpreted cautiously. There was a progressive decrease in mean stress scores for females, and mean uncertainty scores in males, as the years representing the age categories increased. However, mean stress scores in males and mean uncertainty scores both increased from 20-34 to the 35-54 year old age categories, then declined in the 55-74 year old age category. Thus, mean stress scores for males and mean uncertainty scores for females follow a similar trend, as do mean stress scores for females and mean uncertainty scores for males. The 55-74 year old age group had the lowest mean scores for both stress and uncertainty. IMPLICATIONS: The findings of this study reveal the need to further assess age differences by gender in persons with cardiovascular disease who are online computer support group users. Generalizability of findings in this Internet population is limited. However, six million Americans seek health information and support on the Internet daily (The Pew Internet and American Life Report, 2000). Cardiovascular disease affects 59.7 million Americans annually (American Heart Association, 2000). Differences between those with cardiovascular disease in the general population, and those who use the Internet, must be assessed to determine demographic differences that may influence perception of stress and uncertainty. Although the numbers of persons with cardiovascular disease who use online health care services is unknown, the increasing use of the Internet for health support calls for assessment of this population so that effective telehealth interventions can be developed for those who are unable to participate in traditional support groups. Further assessment of baseline perceptions of stress and uncertainty will allow development of targeted interventions intended for differing audiences, particularly by age and gender. In addition, decreased length of hospital stays, and the growing nursing shortage highlight the need to develop cost-effective and time-sensitive nursing services that may benefit the most numbers of persons with cardiovascular disease, and take into account stress and uncertainty concerns in this population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:47Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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