Underutilization of nurse practitioners in health professional shortage areas

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147475
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Underutilization of nurse practitioners in health professional shortage areas
Abstract:
Underutilization of nurse practitioners in health professional shortage areas
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Kippenbrock, Thomas, DEd
P.I. Institution Name:Arkansas State University
Title:Assistant Department Chair
Objectives: The aims of the study were to examine the nurse practitioners’ (NP) workplace distribution and primary specialty areas of practice; the NPs’ professional work conditions; the relationship between the NPs’ racial and ethnic characteristics and the demographic characteristics of Mississippi Delta counties; and the NPs’ practice in communities designated as health professional shortage areas (HPSAs). Design: The design was a descriptive, non-experimental, survey technique. Sample: A stratified random sample of 2,147 NPs from Arkansas, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana was studied. Variables: Nurse practitioners, practice conditions, populations served, and workplace distribution. Methods: State Boards of Nursing supplied NPs’ names and addresses. A survey instrument consisting of open-ended questions and multiple choice responses was mailed to the subjects. The U.S. Census Bureau (1990) supplied statistical information about the communities. The Bureau of Primary Health Care data was used to identify HPSAs. Findings: A total of 453 of 1073 surveys were returned for a response rate of 42%. The three most frequent employers of NPs were MD private practice, hospitals/medical centers, and rural health clinics. The most common NP specialties were family practice, women’s health, adult health, and pediatrics. The average number of hours worked per week was 38. While the majority of NPs had prescriptive authority, only a small percentage held a DEA number or was granted hospital/nursing home privileges. Fifty-nine percent of NPs worked in rural settings. Significant positive relationships occurred between NPs and counties with a higher percentage of poverty (r = .23), counties with a higher percentage of black citizens (r = 0.20), and counties with a higher percentage of sewers (r = 0.11). Significant negative relationships occurred between NPs and counties with higher percentages of citizens with 12th grade education (r = -0.18) and counties with higher percentages of Hispanic citizens (r = -0.11). There was no significant correlation between the NP’s county of employment and counties identified as HPSAs. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that NPs practice in rural settings. The proportion of NPs practicing in rural settings in each state exceeds the percentage of the population identified as rural in each state. There is a mildly significant relationship between NPs’ practice in counties with higher black citizen counts and higher poverty rates. Furthermore, there is a negative relationship with more educated citizens. Implications: Recommendations include higher salaries and additional benefits as incentives for NPs to relocate to HPSAs. Health care institutions should consider providing additional resources such as transportation, continuing education, and supplemental housing to attract NPs to HPSAs. Universities and nursing colleges need to recruit potential NP students from HPSA communities with the understanding the NP graduate will return to their “home” community to practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderutilization of nurse practitioners in health professional shortage areasen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147475-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Underutilization of nurse practitioners in health professional shortage areas</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kippenbrock, Thomas, DEd</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arkansas State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Department Chair</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tkippen@mail.astate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: The aims of the study were to examine the nurse practitioners&rsquo; (NP) workplace distribution and primary specialty areas of practice; the NPs&rsquo; professional work conditions; the relationship between the NPs&rsquo; racial and ethnic characteristics and the demographic characteristics of Mississippi Delta counties; and the NPs&rsquo; practice in communities designated as health professional shortage areas (HPSAs). Design: The design was a descriptive, non-experimental, survey technique. Sample: A stratified random sample of 2,147 NPs from Arkansas, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana was studied. Variables: Nurse practitioners, practice conditions, populations served, and workplace distribution. Methods: State Boards of Nursing supplied NPs&rsquo; names and addresses. A survey instrument consisting of open-ended questions and multiple choice responses was mailed to the subjects. The U.S. Census Bureau (1990) supplied statistical information about the communities. The Bureau of Primary Health Care data was used to identify HPSAs. Findings: A total of 453 of 1073 surveys were returned for a response rate of 42%. The three most frequent employers of NPs were MD private practice, hospitals/medical centers, and rural health clinics. The most common NP specialties were family practice, women&rsquo;s health, adult health, and pediatrics. The average number of hours worked per week was 38. While the majority of NPs had prescriptive authority, only a small percentage held a DEA number or was granted hospital/nursing home privileges. Fifty-nine percent of NPs worked in rural settings. Significant positive relationships occurred between NPs and counties with a higher percentage of poverty (r = .23), counties with a higher percentage of black citizens (r = 0.20), and counties with a higher percentage of sewers (r = 0.11). Significant negative relationships occurred between NPs and counties with higher percentages of citizens with 12th grade education (r = -0.18) and counties with higher percentages of Hispanic citizens (r = -0.11). There was no significant correlation between the NP&rsquo;s county of employment and counties identified as HPSAs. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that NPs practice in rural settings. The proportion of NPs practicing in rural settings in each state exceeds the percentage of the population identified as rural in each state. There is a mildly significant relationship between NPs&rsquo; practice in counties with higher black citizen counts and higher poverty rates. Furthermore, there is a negative relationship with more educated citizens. Implications: Recommendations include higher salaries and additional benefits as incentives for NPs to relocate to HPSAs. Health care institutions should consider providing additional resources such as transportation, continuing education, and supplemental housing to attract NPs to HPSAs. Universities and nursing colleges need to recruit potential NP students from HPSA communities with the understanding the NP graduate will return to their &ldquo;home&rdquo; community to practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:48Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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