6.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147479
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Pattern of American Indians: Harmony Ethos
Abstract:
The Pattern of American Indians: Harmony Ethos
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Nichols, Lee
P.I. Institution Name:University of Tulsa
A lack of understanding about Indian parenting exists among service providers and researchers. Researchers rely on non-Indian family paradigms for assessing parenting styles in American Indian families, particularly families with developmental disabilities. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the need for alternative paradigms for use in assessing American Indian parenting for families with developmental disabilities and to demonstrate how a conceptual model with an “Indian perspective” was developed and utilized. The conceptual framework, The Pattern of American Indians: Harmony Ethos, was developed from a study about Cherokee mothers and parenting. This conceptual framework was developed from American Indian philosophy, the “Indian way of knowing”, and Martha Rogers’ Science or Unitary Human Beings. Concepts from American Indian philosophy include: spirituality, living in harmony, passive forbearance, indirect communication, “Indian time”, self determination, and interdependence. By using this “Indian model” to guide the Cherokee mothers’ study, cultural variation of parenting among Cherokee mothers were identified and described by mothers as sources of parental strengths. Cherokee mothers parented in a way that the harmony (natural development) of their children’s lives was promoted through passive forbearance (pattern). The mothers did not parent in a way that controlled their children’s development but rather they parented in a way that enhance their children’s natural development through unobtrusive, respectful behaviors like listening, observing, and being an example (passive forbearance). Seven patterns of Cherokee parenting were described. The Harmony Ethos model was used as the conceptual model in another study involving American Indian families with developmental disabilities. Findings included three patterns of cultural care Indian families provide to their children with disabilities. These patterns include: (1) building knowledge for children to become self-reliant; (2) teaching children with disabilities how to live in harmony; and (3) integrating a child with a disability into the family to create a harmonious whole. This kind of model building, using an American Indian perspective, is essential for developing useful paradigms in studying Indian families with and without developmental disabilities, and developing reliable and valid instruments to assess family functioning for culturally diverse families.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Pattern of American Indians: Harmony Ethosen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147479-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Pattern of American Indians: Harmony Ethos</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nichols, Lee</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Tulsa</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lee-nichols@utulsa.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A lack of understanding about Indian parenting exists among service providers and researchers. Researchers rely on non-Indian family paradigms for assessing parenting styles in American Indian families, particularly families with developmental disabilities. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the need for alternative paradigms for use in assessing American Indian parenting for families with developmental disabilities and to demonstrate how a conceptual model with an &ldquo;Indian perspective&rdquo; was developed and utilized. The conceptual framework, The Pattern of American Indians: Harmony Ethos, was developed from a study about Cherokee mothers and parenting. This conceptual framework was developed from American Indian philosophy, the &ldquo;Indian way of knowing&rdquo;, and Martha Rogers&rsquo; Science or Unitary Human Beings. Concepts from American Indian philosophy include: spirituality, living in harmony, passive forbearance, indirect communication, &ldquo;Indian time&rdquo;, self determination, and interdependence. By using this &ldquo;Indian model&rdquo; to guide the Cherokee mothers&rsquo; study, cultural variation of parenting among Cherokee mothers were identified and described by mothers as sources of parental strengths. Cherokee mothers parented in a way that the harmony (natural development) of their children&rsquo;s lives was promoted through passive forbearance (pattern). The mothers did not parent in a way that controlled their children&rsquo;s development but rather they parented in a way that enhance their children&rsquo;s natural development through unobtrusive, respectful behaviors like listening, observing, and being an example (passive forbearance). Seven patterns of Cherokee parenting were described. The Harmony Ethos model was used as the conceptual model in another study involving American Indian families with developmental disabilities. Findings included three patterns of cultural care Indian families provide to their children with disabilities. These patterns include: (1) building knowledge for children to become self-reliant; (2) teaching children with disabilities how to live in harmony; and (3) integrating a child with a disability into the family to create a harmonious whole. This kind of model building, using an American Indian perspective, is essential for developing useful paradigms in studying Indian families with and without developmental disabilities, and developing reliable and valid instruments to assess family functioning for culturally diverse families.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:50Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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