2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147483
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women’s Prodromal Symptoms of Myocardial Infarction
Abstract:
Women’s Prodromal Symptoms of Myocardial Infarction
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:McSweeney, Jean, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Title:Associate Professor
Significance Despite decades of research, cardiovascular disease remains the number one cause of death in men and women. One reason it has retained this ranking is due to failure to recognize and treat prodromal symptoms of coronary heart disease (CHD). Identifying common prodromal symptoms, those symptoms that come and go before and change after a myocardial infarction (MI), could lead to earlier detection and treatment of CHD and prevent or delay MI. Prodromal symptoms are especially important to identify in women since they experience both higher morbidity and disability than men do and are more likely than men to die in the year after a MI. However, since the majority of women are unaware of their risk for CHD, they often ignore prodromal symptoms, perhaps because they do not match their expectations or do not believe the symptoms indicate heart problems. Likewise, health care providers may have difficulty recognizing and treating women's prodromal symptoms appropriately. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe women’s most frequent prodromal symptoms associated with their MI. Research Question and Methods: The research questions were: (a) What are women’s most frequently reported prodromal symptoms of MI?, and (b) Is there a difference in reported prodromal symptoms in women experiencing their first MI as compared to those with recurrent MI? I conducted structured telephone interviews with 191 Caucasian women who had experienced an acute MI in the previous 4-6 months using McSweeney’s Acute and Prodromal Myocardial Infarction Symptom Survey tool. This survey instrument has a test-retest reliability of 0.850 (p <0.001). Summary of Results: The sample had a high school education or less (72%) and income less than $19,999 per year (53%). Ages ranged from 30 to 94 (M=66). Women reported pre-existing hypertension (67%), high cholesterol levels (45%), chronic heartburn (38%) and diabetes (31%). Of the 191 women, 94% experienced prodromal symptoms ranging from 1 to 25 (M=6.3). The most frequent prodromal symptoms were unusual fatigue (66%), sleep disturbance (50%), shortness of breath (49%), indigestion (46%), and anxiety (38%). To answer the second research question, an independent t-test was used to explore if differences existed in prodromal symptom scores of women experiencing their first MI and those with recurrent MI. There was no significant difference in prodromal symptom scores between these groups. Implications for Nursing Practice: Women in this study were seldom diagnosed with CHD prior to their MI despite the prevalence of prodromal symptoms. Clearly, more research is needed to develop a constellation of prodromal symptoms to assist practitioners in diagnosing CHD and to assist women to recognize symptoms earlier so that they may receive appropriate treatment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen’s Prodromal Symptoms of Myocardial Infarctionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147483-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women&rsquo;s Prodromal Symptoms of Myocardial Infarction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McSweeney, Jean, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mcsweeneyjeanc@uams.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Significance Despite decades of research, cardiovascular disease remains the number one cause of death in men and women. One reason it has retained this ranking is due to failure to recognize and treat prodromal symptoms of coronary heart disease (CHD). Identifying common prodromal symptoms, those symptoms that come and go before and change after a myocardial infarction (MI), could lead to earlier detection and treatment of CHD and prevent or delay MI. Prodromal symptoms are especially important to identify in women since they experience both higher morbidity and disability than men do and are more likely than men to die in the year after a MI. However, since the majority of women are unaware of their risk for CHD, they often ignore prodromal symptoms, perhaps because they do not match their expectations or do not believe the symptoms indicate heart problems. Likewise, health care providers may have difficulty recognizing and treating women's prodromal symptoms appropriately. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe women&rsquo;s most frequent prodromal symptoms associated with their MI. Research Question and Methods: The research questions were: (a) What are women&rsquo;s most frequently reported prodromal symptoms of MI?, and (b) Is there a difference in reported prodromal symptoms in women experiencing their first MI as compared to those with recurrent MI? I conducted structured telephone interviews with 191 Caucasian women who had experienced an acute MI in the previous 4-6 months using McSweeney&rsquo;s Acute and Prodromal Myocardial Infarction Symptom Survey tool. This survey instrument has a test-retest reliability of 0.850 (p &lt;0.001). Summary of Results: The sample had a high school education or less (72%) and income less than $19,999 per year (53%). Ages ranged from 30 to 94 (M=66). Women reported pre-existing hypertension (67%), high cholesterol levels (45%), chronic heartburn (38%) and diabetes (31%). Of the 191 women, 94% experienced prodromal symptoms ranging from 1 to 25 (M=6.3). The most frequent prodromal symptoms were unusual fatigue (66%), sleep disturbance (50%), shortness of breath (49%), indigestion (46%), and anxiety (38%). To answer the second research question, an independent t-test was used to explore if differences existed in prodromal symptom scores of women experiencing their first MI and those with recurrent MI. There was no significant difference in prodromal symptom scores between these groups. Implications for Nursing Practice: Women in this study were seldom diagnosed with CHD prior to their MI despite the prevalence of prodromal symptoms. Clearly, more research is needed to develop a constellation of prodromal symptoms to assist practitioners in diagnosing CHD and to assist women to recognize symptoms earlier so that they may receive appropriate treatment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:53Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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