Health-Related Quality of Life and Symptom Distress in Patients Prior to Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147491
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health-Related Quality of Life and Symptom Distress in Patients Prior to Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant
Abstract:
Health-Related Quality of Life and Symptom Distress in Patients Prior to Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Bevans, Margaret, RN, MS, AOCN
P.I. Institution Name:National Institutes of Health/ Clinical Center
Title:Clinical Nurse Specialist
Co-Authors:Susan Marden, PhD, RN
Objective: This study examined health-related quality of life (HRQL) and symptom distress (SD) in patients preparing to undergo allogeneic stem-cell transplant (A-SCT) for the treatment of hematological diseases. Design: Prospective survey of patients enrolled in an A-SCT trial in the United States (US). Population, sample, setting: Patients (N=76) were mostly male (67%), ranging in age from 18 – 71 years (M=40; SD=13.5), Caucasian (46%) or Hispanic (30%), predominantly with hematological malignancies (71%). Most (97%) had ECOG (performance status) <2. Variables: HRQL was measured by the physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) health scores of the Short Form-36 (range 0-100) and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G; range 0-100). SD was measured by the Symptom Distress Scale (SDS; range 13-65). Methods: Patients completed the questionnaires in English or Spanish via a touch-screen computer during the trial baseline period. Scores were compared to published references for the 1998 general US population (GP) and a cancer population (CP) using one sample t-tests. Findings: Baseline results demonstrate mean PCS and MCS scores of pre-A-SCT patients were significantly lower than the GP (norm=50 vs 42.7, p<0.001 and 46.9, p<0.15, respectively). The mean PCS score for men was significantly lower than GP males (norm=50.9 vs 42; p<0.001); for women, the mean MCS score was significantly lower than GP females (norm=49.5 vs 43; p=.017). FACT-G total score was significantly lower than patients with Hodgkins disease (58.9 vs 66; p<0.001). Seventy-six percent of SDS scores indicated low SD (<25); 24% indicated moderate distress (>25). Conclusion: Men and women preparing for A-SCT have significantly poorer HRQL compared to the US GP and another cancer population, with relatively low levels of SD. Implications: Outcomes measurement of HRQL and SD prior to A-SCT can assist clinicians in the management of patients following transplant.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth-Related Quality of Life and Symptom Distress in Patients Prior to Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplanten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147491-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health-Related Quality of Life and Symptom Distress in Patients Prior to Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bevans, Margaret, RN, MS, AOCN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">National Institutes of Health/ Clinical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mbevans@nih.gov</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan Marden, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This study examined health-related quality of life (HRQL) and symptom distress (SD) in patients preparing to undergo allogeneic stem-cell transplant (A-SCT) for the treatment of hematological diseases. Design: Prospective survey of patients enrolled in an A-SCT trial in the United States (US). Population, sample, setting: Patients (N=76) were mostly male (67%), ranging in age from 18 &ndash; 71 years (M=40; SD=13.5), Caucasian (46%) or Hispanic (30%), predominantly with hematological malignancies (71%). Most (97%) had ECOG (performance status) &lt;2. Variables: HRQL was measured by the physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) health scores of the Short Form-36 (range 0-100) and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G; range 0-100). SD was measured by the Symptom Distress Scale (SDS; range 13-65). Methods: Patients completed the questionnaires in English or Spanish via a touch-screen computer during the trial baseline period. Scores were compared to published references for the 1998 general US population (GP) and a cancer population (CP) using one sample t-tests. Findings: Baseline results demonstrate mean PCS and MCS scores of pre-A-SCT patients were significantly lower than the GP (norm=50 vs 42.7, p&lt;0.001 and 46.9, p&lt;0.15, respectively). The mean PCS score for men was significantly lower than GP males (norm=50.9 vs 42; p&lt;0.001); for women, the mean MCS score was significantly lower than GP females (norm=49.5 vs 43; p=.017). FACT-G total score was significantly lower than patients with Hodgkins disease (58.9 vs 66; p&lt;0.001). Seventy-six percent of SDS scores indicated low SD (&lt;25); 24% indicated moderate distress (&gt;25). Conclusion: Men and women preparing for A-SCT have significantly poorer HRQL compared to the US GP and another cancer population, with relatively low levels of SD. Implications: Outcomes measurement of HRQL and SD prior to A-SCT can assist clinicians in the management of patients following transplant.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:32:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:32:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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