Leaving the Abyss: A Phenomenological Study of Women Recovering from Alcoholism

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147498
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Leaving the Abyss: A Phenomenological Study of Women Recovering from Alcoholism
Abstract:
Leaving the Abyss: A Phenomenological Study of Women Recovering from Alcoholism
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Brewer, M. Kathleen, PhD, RN, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:Georgia Baptist College of Nursing of Mercer University
Title:Associate Professor
Alcoholism is a chronic, progressive, potentially fatal disease which afflicts both men and women. While there is no known cure for alcoholism, recovery from the disease is possible. What is known about recovery from alcoholism has been learned by studying male alcoholics. Little is known about female alcoholics and their recovery experiences. The purpose of the Phenomenological study was to describe women's experiences of recovery from alcoholism, and to identify the contextual factors that foster or hinder their recovery processes. Criteria for participation were: women self-identifying as recovering from alcoholism; aged 25 years and older; able to converse in English; and abstinent from alcohol use for a minimum of two consecutive years. Eleven women (7 Caucasians, 3 African-Americans, 1 native-American Indian, 8 heterosexuals, and 3 lesbians) were recruited through purposive sampling from the self help groups of Alcoholics Anonymous, Seculars for Sobriety, and Women for Sobriety, and ranged in age from 32 to 76 years. Data were collected through individual audiotaped interviews that lasted about 45 minutes. Analyzed data revealed the following themes and subthemes: (1)Living in the Abyss with subthemes of Hitting Botton, Experiencing an Epiphany,Accepting the Disease of Alcoholism; (2)Leaving the Abyss with subthemes of Making a Commitment to Recovery, Struggling to Maintain Sobriety, Dealing with Stigmatization; (3) Maintaining Recovery with subthemes of Working a Program of Recovery, Recognizing Triggers to Relapse; and (4) Living a New Life with subthemes of Experiencing Inner Peace and Believing in Self. Knowledge from this study may be used to inform nurse clinicians, nurse educators, and nurses involved in public policy decisions about the experiences of recovery for alcoholic women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLeaving the Abyss: A Phenomenological Study of Women Recovering from Alcoholismen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147498-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Leaving the Abyss: A Phenomenological Study of Women Recovering from Alcoholism</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brewer, M. Kathleen, PhD, RN, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Georgia Baptist College of Nursing of Mercer University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">brewer_mk@mercer.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Alcoholism is a chronic, progressive, potentially fatal disease which afflicts both men and women. While there is no known cure for alcoholism, recovery from the disease is possible. What is known about recovery from alcoholism has been learned by studying male alcoholics. Little is known about female alcoholics and their recovery experiences. The purpose of the Phenomenological study was to describe women's experiences of recovery from alcoholism, and to identify the contextual factors that foster or hinder their recovery processes. Criteria for participation were: women self-identifying as recovering from alcoholism; aged 25 years and older; able to converse in English; and abstinent from alcohol use for a minimum of two consecutive years. Eleven women (7 Caucasians, 3 African-Americans, 1 native-American Indian, 8 heterosexuals, and 3 lesbians) were recruited through purposive sampling from the self help groups of Alcoholics Anonymous, Seculars for Sobriety, and Women for Sobriety, and ranged in age from 32 to 76 years. Data were collected through individual audiotaped interviews that lasted about 45 minutes. Analyzed data revealed the following themes and subthemes: (1)Living in the Abyss with subthemes of Hitting Botton, Experiencing an Epiphany,Accepting the Disease of Alcoholism; (2)Leaving the Abyss with subthemes of Making a Commitment to Recovery, Struggling to Maintain Sobriety, Dealing with Stigmatization; (3) Maintaining Recovery with subthemes of Working a Program of Recovery, Recognizing Triggers to Relapse; and (4) Living a New Life with subthemes of Experiencing Inner Peace and Believing in Self. Knowledge from this study may be used to inform nurse clinicians, nurse educators, and nurses involved in public policy decisions about the experiences of recovery for alcoholic women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:33:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:33:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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