Teaching Critical Thinking: Lessons from an Emergency Department Educator

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147550
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Teaching Critical Thinking: Lessons from an Emergency Department Educator
Abstract:
Teaching Critical Thinking: Lessons from an Emergency Department Educator
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Wolf, Lisa
P.I. Institution Name:University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Title:Clinical Assistant Professor
[Clinical session research presentation] Emergency Department (ED) nursing is different from other kinds of nursing in that it requires a specific skill set related to the inherently unstable nature of many ED patients, the need for constant reevaluation and openness to shifting priorities, quick but accurate assessment and prioritization, orderly and thorough documentation without traditional flow sheets and relevant communication skills necessary for both professional and determined advocacy for patients of all acuity levels. The range and breadth of ED nursing also is such that true proficiency is not usually achieved without at least one-to-two years of clinical experience. Thus, what can be more important than teaching the "content" is teaching the "process" of critical thinking, recognizing that there are different ways to describe how we come to useful clinical decision making. Having developed a way to teach process more than content using clinical mapping, case studies, in situ decision making exercises, and using the educator as primary preceptor, ED orientation programs as well as orientations in other areas of nursing can be made more efficient and successful. Most orientation programs are not as successful as they could be because the staff is overwhelmed, the atmosphere in most units is not conducive to learning, and the staff is not trained to teach what the orientee needs to know. When the educator is precepting, the staff is not overwhelmed with the task of teaching from scratch, the orientee feels freer to ask questions, and learning, not just surviving, is the objective. Critical thinking can be better developed in this atmosphere, and the incorporation of new nurses into the culture of the ED or floor is more welcoming than the traditional "survival of the fittest" model.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTeaching Critical Thinking: Lessons from an Emergency Department Educatoren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147550-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Teaching Critical Thinking: Lessons from an Emergency Department Educator</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wolf, Lisa</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Massachusetts, Amherst</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">noblewolf3@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] Emergency Department (ED)&nbsp;nursing is different from other kinds of nursing in that it requires a specific skill set related to the inherently unstable nature of many ED patients, the need for constant reevaluation and openness to shifting priorities, quick but accurate assessment and prioritization, orderly and thorough documentation without traditional flow sheets and relevant communication skills necessary for both professional and determined advocacy for patients of all acuity levels. The range and breadth of ED nursing also is such that true proficiency is not usually achieved without at least one-to-two years of clinical experience. Thus, what can be more important than teaching the &quot;content&quot; is teaching the &quot;process&quot; of critical thinking, recognizing that there are different ways to describe how we come to useful clinical decision making. Having developed a way to teach process more than content using clinical mapping, case studies, in situ decision making exercises, and using the educator as primary preceptor, ED orientation programs as well as orientations in other areas of nursing can be made more efficient and successful. Most orientation programs are not as successful as they could be because the staff is overwhelmed, the atmosphere in most units is not conducive to learning, and the staff is not trained to teach what the orientee needs to know. When the educator is precepting, the staff is not overwhelmed with the task of teaching from scratch, the orientee feels freer to ask questions, and learning, not just surviving, is the objective. Critical thinking can be better developed in this atmosphere, and the incorporation of new nurses into the culture of the ED or floor is more welcoming than the traditional &quot;survival of the fittest&quot; model.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:33:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:33:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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