Nurse Educators' Perceived Self-Efficacy for Clinical Teaching in Baccalaureate Nursing Education Programs

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147551
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Educators' Perceived Self-Efficacy for Clinical Teaching in Baccalaureate Nursing Education Programs
Abstract:
Nurse Educators' Perceived Self-Efficacy for Clinical Teaching in Baccalaureate Nursing Education Programs
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Wood, Jennifer L.
P.I. Institution Name:Conestoga College- In Collaboration with McMaster University
Title:Professor
[Clinical session research presentation] The purpose of this non-experimental, exploratory, descriptive, correlational study was to determine the perceived self-efficacy (SE) of nurse educators for clinical teaching in baccalaureate nursing education (BScN) programs in Ontario. Albert Bandura's (1977, 1986) SE theory was used as a framework. One hundred and thirty-seven clinical nurse educators were surveyed, reflecting a 42 % response rate. Nurse educators completed the Self-Efficacy for Clinical Teaching Inventory (SEFCTI), the Sources for Self-Efficacy Information (SSEI), the Personal Experience Comments (PEC), and the Nurse Educator Demographic Questionnaire (NEDQ). Participants rated themselves to be highly efficacious for clinical teaching. Their perceived confidence for clinical teaching was positively related to mastery experience and verbal persuasion. Although vicarious experiences and physiological arousal were somewhat positively related to perceived confidence for clinical teaching, these results were not statistically significant. As well, among the major demographic variables correlated, years of clinical teaching and years in current teaching position demonstrated significant statistical relationships. The results of this study lend support for continued development of SE for clinical teaching as a theoretical construct based on Bandura's theory.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse Educators' Perceived Self-Efficacy for Clinical Teaching in Baccalaureate Nursing Education Programsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147551-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurse Educators' Perceived Self-Efficacy for Clinical Teaching in Baccalaureate Nursing Education Programs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wood, Jennifer L.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Conestoga College- In Collaboration with McMaster University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jwood@conestogac.on.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] The purpose of this non-experimental, exploratory, descriptive, correlational study was to determine the perceived self-efficacy (SE) of nurse educators for clinical teaching in baccalaureate nursing education (BScN) programs in Ontario. Albert Bandura's (1977, 1986) SE theory was used as a framework. One hundred and thirty-seven clinical nurse educators were surveyed, reflecting a 42 % response rate. Nurse educators completed the Self-Efficacy for Clinical Teaching Inventory (SEFCTI), the Sources for Self-Efficacy Information (SSEI), the Personal Experience Comments (PEC), and the Nurse Educator Demographic Questionnaire (NEDQ). Participants rated themselves to be highly efficacious for clinical teaching. Their perceived confidence for clinical teaching was positively related to mastery experience and verbal persuasion. Although vicarious experiences and physiological arousal were somewhat positively related to perceived confidence for clinical teaching, these results were not statistically significant. As well, among the major demographic variables correlated, years of clinical teaching and years in current teaching position demonstrated significant statistical relationships. The results of this study lend support for continued development of SE for clinical teaching as a theoretical construct based on Bandura's theory.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:33:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:33:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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