Service Learning in the 21st Century: Creating a Collaboration Model for Disaster Mitigation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147568
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Service Learning in the 21st Century: Creating a Collaboration Model for Disaster Mitigation
Abstract:
Service Learning in the 21st Century: Creating a Collaboration Model for Disaster Mitigation
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Bulfin, Susan J., DNP
P.I. Institution Name:Georgia Baptist College of Nursing of Mercer University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Sara H. Mitchell, PhD; Julie D. Jones, RN, MS, ND
[Clinical Session Presentation] Students enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing program in a large city in the southeastern United States were invited to participate in a service learning opportunity which brought together health care agencies and educational facilities at both state and local levels. The purpose of the program was twofold: to provide influenza vaccinations to a significant number of students, faculty, and staff in several elementary, middle, and local high schools and to evaluate a model designed to provide necessary interventions to a large population in the event of a pandemic or a disaster. Twenty five nursing students participated in the program on two separate days during which 675 individuals received the influenza vaccine.  Nursing student activities included registration, form completion, patient flow organization, vaccine temperature monitoring, vaccine distribution and administration, checkout, and consent form filing. Participating student nurses were asked to evaluate their experience by responding to eight questions using a five point likert scale. Student responses were given anonymously so as to encourage truthful responses without fear of faculty reprisal for negative feedback. Two additional questions asked for narrative feedback. An overwhelmingly positive percentage of students reported an enhanced understanding of the need for mass influenza immunization, the necessity of multidisciplinary planning, and the need for collaboration across disciplines. There were also a significant number of students who reported an increased understanding of the role of the community health nurse as well as the importance of population focused community heath.  While a few of the students were involved in the actual administration of the flu vaccine, the majority of students were assigned to patient flow and registration. When queried, students unanimously stated that more "hands on" involvement in the administration of the vaccine would have enhanced their experience.  Recommendations for the future include increased student participation in vaccine administration and nursing triage in order to enhance the students' feeling of involvement and to increase direct client contact.  Additionally, faculty/student conferences before and after the exercise could be included to allow discussion time, during which faculty could direct student understanding about how their experience can be applied to broader circumstances such as pandemics and natural or man-made disasters.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleService Learning in the 21st Century: Creating a Collaboration Model for Disaster Mitigationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147568-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Service Learning in the 21st Century: Creating a Collaboration Model for Disaster Mitigation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bulfin, Susan J., DNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Georgia Baptist College of Nursing of Mercer University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bulfin_sj@mercer.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sara H. Mitchell, PhD; Julie D. Jones, RN, MS, ND</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical Session Presentation] Students enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing program in a large city in the southeastern United States were invited to participate in a service learning opportunity which brought together health care agencies and educational facilities at both state and local levels. The purpose of the program was twofold: to provide influenza vaccinations to a significant number of students, faculty, and staff in several elementary, middle, and local high schools and to evaluate a model designed to provide necessary interventions to a large population in the event of a pandemic or a disaster. Twenty five nursing students participated in the program on two separate days during which 675 individuals received the influenza vaccine.&nbsp; Nursing student activities included registration, form completion, patient flow organization, vaccine temperature monitoring, vaccine distribution and administration, checkout, and consent form filing. Participating student nurses were asked to evaluate their experience by responding to eight questions using a five point likert scale. Student responses were given anonymously so as to encourage truthful responses without fear of faculty reprisal for negative feedback. Two additional questions asked for narrative feedback. An overwhelmingly positive percentage of students reported an enhanced understanding of the need for mass influenza immunization, the necessity of multidisciplinary planning, and the need for collaboration across disciplines. There were also a significant number of students who reported an increased understanding of the role of the community health nurse as well as the importance of population focused community heath.&nbsp; While a few of the students were involved in the actual administration of the flu vaccine, the majority of students were assigned to patient flow and registration. When queried, students unanimously stated that more &quot;hands on&quot; involvement in the administration of the vaccine would have enhanced their experience.&nbsp; Recommendations for the future include increased student participation in vaccine administration and nursing triage in order to enhance the students' feeling of involvement and to increase direct client contact.&nbsp; Additionally, faculty/student conferences before and after the exercise could be included to allow discussion time, during which faculty could direct student understanding about how their experience can be applied to broader circumstances such as pandemics and natural or man-made disasters.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:33:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:33:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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