College Student Risk Behavior: The Implications of Religiosity and Impulsivity

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147570
Type:
Presentation
Title:
College Student Risk Behavior: The Implications of Religiosity and Impulsivity
Abstract:
College Student Risk Behavior: The Implications of Religiosity and Impulsivity
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Cazzell, Mary, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas at Arlington School of Nursing
Title:Graduate Research Assistant
[Invited Poster or Paper Session] In the United States, 71 percent of all deaths among persons aged 10 to 24 years are: automobile accidents, unintentional injuries, homicides, and suicides. Neuroimaging studies associate behaviors of reward-seeking and impulsivity as normative imbalances within the adolescent brain. Reward-seeking risk behaviors are associated with the earlier maturation of the limbic system and the slower maturation of the prefrontal cortex [PFC], not until the mid-twenties. An immature PFC is associated with impulsivity or failure to choose appropriate actions. Despite immature neurobiology, not all adolescents engage in risky behaviors; suggesting that there are inhibitory or protective factors deterring risk behaviors. Religiosity is known to influence adolescent attitudes and behaviors in positive and constructive ways. Sparse literature exists explaining the effects of religiosity on college students? behavior and attitudes; since religiosity is originally influenced by parents. The aim of this cross-sectional correlational study is to determine the strength of associations between religiosity, impulsivity, and risk-taking propensity among a diverse sample of college students who live away from home (18-20 years; N = 80) from a public university in the southwestern United States.  The participants will complete the Age-Universal Intrinsic-Extrinsic-12 Religiosity Scale, The Tower of Hanoi (computer-generated behavioral game measuring impulsive patterns of errors), and Balloon Analogue Risk Task (computer-generated balloon-pumping game measuring average number of pumps that did not explode balloons as index of risk-taking propensity). Chi-square tests will be performed on demographic variables to determine sampling effects. Multiple regression analyses will be performed to determine if impulsivity differentially mediated intrinsic and extrinsic religiosity?s independent effects on risk behavior. Separate regression analyses will be performed on religiosity scores and BART scores; plus TOH scores and BART scores. Study results have important prevention and intervention implications for parents and professionals who work with adolescents in academic, criminal justice, counseling, and health care settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCollege Student Risk Behavior: The Implications of Religiosity and Impulsivityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147570-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">College Student Risk Behavior: The Implications of Religiosity and Impulsivity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cazzell, Mary, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas at Arlington School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate Research Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mary.cazzell@mavs.uta.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Invited Poster or Paper Session] In the United States, 71 percent of all deaths among persons aged 10 to 24 years are: automobile accidents, unintentional injuries, homicides, and suicides. Neuroimaging studies associate behaviors of reward-seeking and impulsivity as normative imbalances within the adolescent brain. Reward-seeking risk behaviors are associated with the earlier maturation of the limbic system and the slower maturation of the prefrontal cortex [PFC], not until the mid-twenties. An immature PFC is associated with impulsivity or failure to choose appropriate actions. Despite immature neurobiology, not all adolescents engage in risky behaviors; suggesting that there are inhibitory or protective factors deterring risk behaviors. Religiosity is known to influence adolescent attitudes and behaviors in positive and constructive ways. Sparse literature exists explaining the effects of religiosity on college students? behavior and attitudes; since religiosity is originally influenced by parents. The aim of this cross-sectional correlational study is to determine the strength of associations between religiosity, impulsivity, and risk-taking propensity among a diverse sample of college students who live away from home (18-20 years; N = 80) from a public university in the southwestern United States. &nbsp;The participants will complete the Age-Universal Intrinsic-Extrinsic-12 Religiosity Scale, The Tower of Hanoi (computer-generated behavioral game measuring impulsive patterns of errors), and Balloon Analogue Risk Task (computer-generated balloon-pumping game measuring average number of pumps that did not explode balloons as index of risk-taking propensity). Chi-square tests will be performed on demographic variables to determine sampling effects. Multiple regression analyses will be performed to determine if impulsivity differentially mediated intrinsic and extrinsic religiosity?s independent effects on risk behavior. Separate regression analyses will be performed on religiosity scores and BART scores; plus TOH scores and BART scores. Study results have important prevention and intervention implications for parents and professionals who work with adolescents in academic, criminal justice, counseling, and health care settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:33:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:33:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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