Congruity in Korean-American Adolescents' and Their Parents' Perceptions of Parent-Child Relationships

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147574
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Congruity in Korean-American Adolescents' and Their Parents' Perceptions of Parent-Child Relationships
Abstract:
Congruity in Korean-American Adolescents' and Their Parents' Perceptions of Parent-Child Relationships
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Choi, Heeseung, PhD, MPH, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Barbara Dancy, RN, PhD, FAAN; Louis Fogg, PhD; Eunice Lee, PhD, RN
[Scientific Session Presentation] Purpose: Little is known about Korean American adolescents' (KAA) and their parents' perceptions of parental knowledge about adolescents' school life, parental/filial self-efficacy to communicate, parent-child communication, and parent-child conflicts. Even less is known about the congruity of parents' and adolescents' perceptions. A lack of parental knowledge, inadequate parent-child communication, and increased parent-child conflicts resulting from immigration have been associated with adolescent's mental health problems. This cross-sectional descriptive study examined the correlations between KAAs' aged 11 to 14 years and their parents' report of parental knowledge, parental/filial self-efficacy, parent-child communication, and parent-child conflicts.Theoretical Framework: The Social Cognitive Theory and the Social Ecology Theory guided this study. Method: Thirty-one Korean American (KA) parent-child pairs from two KA churches completed the self-administered questionnaires: Knowledge of Adolescent's School Life, Parental/Filial self-efficacy, Parent-Child Communication Scale for KAs, and Conflict Behavior Questionnaire (CBQ). Data were analyzed using Pearson correlations, followed by cross-classification tables, and chi-square and Kendal's tau-b. Results: Positive correlations between fathers' and KAAs' perceptions of parental knowledge, self-efficacy, parent-child communication, and parent-child conflicts were observed (P less than oe equal to .05). Father and KAAs congruently reported that fathers have limited parental knowledge, low self-efficacy, limited communication with a child, and high parent-child conflicts. Positive correlations between mothers' and KAAs' perceptions of parental knowledge, self-efficacy, and parent-child conflicts were observed (P less than or equal to .05). Although mothers and KAAs agreed that the quality of their mother-child relationship was better than father-child relationship, mothers and KAAs showed incongruent perceptions of communication content and process. Conclusions: Fathers' limited knowledge and communication with a child, low self-efficacy, and high parent-child conflicts reflect traditional parenting roles in Korean culture: breadwinning fathers and nurturing mothers. Considering the fact that inadequate parent-child relationships may have adverse effects on KAAs' mental health, it is necessary to develop interventions enhancing parent-child communication for KA families. The interventions need to be designed to promote fathers involvement in parenting.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCongruity in Korean-American Adolescents' and Their Parents' Perceptions of Parent-Child Relationshipsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147574-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Congruity in Korean-American Adolescents' and Their Parents' Perceptions of Parent-Child Relationships</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Choi, Heeseung, PhD, MPH, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hchoi20@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara Dancy, RN, PhD, FAAN; Louis Fogg, PhD; Eunice Lee, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] Purpose: Little is known about Korean American adolescents' (KAA) and their parents' perceptions of parental knowledge about adolescents' school life, parental/filial self-efficacy to communicate, parent-child communication, and parent-child conflicts. Even less is known about the congruity of parents' and adolescents' perceptions. A lack of parental knowledge, inadequate parent-child communication, and increased parent-child conflicts resulting from immigration have been associated with adolescent's mental health problems. This cross-sectional descriptive study examined the correlations between KAAs' aged 11 to 14 years and their parents' report of parental knowledge, parental/filial self-efficacy, parent-child communication, and parent-child conflicts.Theoretical Framework: The Social Cognitive Theory and the Social Ecology Theory guided this study. Method: Thirty-one Korean American (KA) parent-child pairs from two KA churches completed the self-administered questionnaires: Knowledge of Adolescent's School Life, Parental/Filial self-efficacy, Parent-Child Communication Scale for KAs, and Conflict Behavior Questionnaire (CBQ). Data were analyzed using Pearson correlations, followed by cross-classification tables, and chi-square and Kendal's tau-b. Results: Positive correlations between fathers' and KAAs' perceptions of parental knowledge, self-efficacy, parent-child communication, and parent-child conflicts were observed (P less than oe equal to .05). Father and KAAs congruently reported that fathers have limited parental knowledge, low self-efficacy, limited communication with a child, and high parent-child conflicts. Positive correlations between mothers' and KAAs' perceptions of parental knowledge, self-efficacy, and parent-child conflicts were observed (P less than or equal to .05). Although mothers and KAAs agreed that the quality of their mother-child relationship was better than father-child relationship, mothers and KAAs showed incongruent perceptions of communication content and process. Conclusions: Fathers' limited knowledge and communication with a child, low self-efficacy, and high parent-child conflicts reflect traditional parenting roles in Korean culture: breadwinning fathers and nurturing mothers. Considering the fact that inadequate parent-child relationships may have adverse effects on KAAs' mental health, it is necessary to develop interventions enhancing parent-child communication for KA families. The interventions need to be designed to promote fathers involvement in parenting.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:33:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:33:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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