Examining Standardized Nursing Terminology to Link Research to Practice through Clinical Decision Support Systems

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147584
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examining Standardized Nursing Terminology to Link Research to Practice through Clinical Decision Support Systems
Abstract:
Examining Standardized Nursing Terminology to Link Research to Practice through Clinical Decision Support Systems
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Dontje, Katherine Jordan, MSN, APRN, BC, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Co-Authors:Amy Coenen, PhD
[Scientific Session Presentation] National organizations including the Institute of Medicine and the American Nurses Association have identified a need for healthcare reform to improve patient outcomes. Recommendations from these organizations include the need to use information technology as tools to facilitate change. The use of tools such as clinical decision support (CDS) systems within clinical information systems (CIS) can deliver information to the nurse at the point of care.Standardized nursing terminologies (SNT) were developed to provide a standard means for nurses to document the domain of nursing practice, integrate nursing concepts into CIS, and improve ease of data use and retrieval. Evidence-based practice (EBP) recommendations provide guidelines for best nursing practice. CDS systems provide information and knowledge to nurses at the point of care. Conceptual frameworks representing the relationships among these tools (SNTs, EBP recommendations, and CDS systems) will be examined in this paper. The ability to use these tools to measure patient outcomes for national and international comparison also will be discussed.An exemplar describing the development of EBP recommendations and mapping these recommendations to SNTs will be presented. EBP recommendations for adult patients with depression in primary care were decomposed into 118 key concepts; these key concepts were mapped to two SNTs (Omaha System and International Classification for Nursing Practice). Results included that 93% of the EBP recommendation key concepts were able to be mapped to one or both of the SNTs. The majority (83%) of these were partial semantic (conceptual) matches, with only 10% complete matches. This research begins to examine the use of SNTs to represent EBP recommendations to support linkages to clinical data in CIS for CDS. Further research is needed to examine the use of SNTs to reduce ambiguity of concepts and support the development of CDS applications within the CIS.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamining Standardized Nursing Terminology to Link Research to Practice through Clinical Decision Support Systemsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147584-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Examining Standardized Nursing Terminology to Link Research to Practice through Clinical Decision Support Systems</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dontje, Katherine Jordan, MSN, APRN, BC, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dontje@msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Amy Coenen, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] National organizations including the Institute of Medicine and the American Nurses Association have identified a need for healthcare reform to improve patient outcomes. Recommendations from these organizations include the need to use information technology as tools to facilitate change. The use of tools such as clinical decision support (CDS) systems within clinical information systems (CIS) can deliver information to the nurse at the point of care.Standardized nursing terminologies (SNT) were developed to provide a standard means for nurses to document the domain of nursing practice, integrate nursing concepts into CIS, and improve ease of data use and retrieval. Evidence-based practice (EBP) recommendations provide guidelines for best nursing practice. CDS systems provide information and knowledge to nurses at the point of care. Conceptual frameworks representing the relationships among these tools (SNTs, EBP recommendations, and CDS systems) will be examined in this paper. The ability to use these tools to measure patient outcomes for national and international comparison also will be discussed.An exemplar describing the development of EBP recommendations and mapping these recommendations to SNTs will be presented. EBP recommendations for adult patients with depression in primary care were decomposed into 118 key concepts; these key concepts were mapped to two SNTs (Omaha System and International Classification for Nursing Practice). Results included that 93% of the EBP recommendation key concepts were able to be mapped to one or both of the SNTs. The majority (83%) of these were partial semantic (conceptual) matches, with only 10% complete matches. This research begins to examine the use of SNTs to represent EBP recommendations to support linkages to clinical data in CIS for CDS. Further research is needed to examine the use of SNTs to reduce ambiguity of concepts and support the development of CDS applications within the CIS.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:33:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:33:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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